eland

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e·land

 (ē′lənd)
n. pl. eland also e·lands
Either of two large African antelopes (Taurotragus oryx or T. derbianus) having a light brown or grayish coat, spirally twisted horns, and in the male a large dewlap.

[Afrikaans, from Dutch, elk, from obsolete German Elend, of Baltic origin; akin to Lithuanian élnias, deer.]

eland

(ˈiːlənd)
n
1. (Animals) a large spiral-horned antelope, Taurotragus oryx, inhabiting bushland in eastern and southern Africa. It has a dewlap and a hump on the shoulders and is light brown with vertical white stripes
2. (Animals) giant eland a similar but larger animal, T. derbianus, living in wooded areas of central and W Africa
[C18: via Afrikaans from Dutch eland elk; related to Old Slavonic jeleni stag, Greek ellos fawn]

e•land

(ˈi lənd)

n., pl. e•lands, (esp. collectively) e•land.
either of two large African antelopes of the genus Taurotragus, having long, spirally twisted horns.
[1780–90; < Afrikaans < Dutch: elk; akin to elk]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eland - either of two large African antelopes of the genus Taurotragus having short spirally twisted horns in both sexeseland - either of two large African antelopes of the genus Taurotragus having short spirally twisted horns in both sexes
antelope - graceful Old World ruminant with long legs and horns directed upward and backward; includes gazelles; springboks; impalas; addax; gerenuks; blackbucks; dik-diks
genus Taurotragus, Taurotragus - African antelopes: elands
common eland, Taurotragus oryx - dark fawn-colored eland of southern and eastern Africa
giant eland, Taurotragus derbianus - large dark striped eland of western equatorial Africa
Translations
References in classic literature ?
There were several species of this beautiful animal, the most magnificent somewhat resembling the giant eland of Africa, except that their spiral horns form a complete curve backward over their ears and then forward again beneath them, ending in sharp and formidable points some two feet before the face and above the eyes.
The tree limbs, from the zoo's own botanical forest, add to the mulberries, acacia and ficus limbs fed to animals from giraffes to giant elands.