giant hogweed


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giant hogweed

n
(Plants) an umbelliferous garden escape, Heracleum mantegazzianum, a tall species of cow parsley that grows up to 3 metres (10 ft) and whose irritant hairs and sap can cause a severe reaction if handled. Also called: cartwheel flower
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Riesenbärenklau
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References in periodicals archive ?
A spokesperson for Stirling Council admitted the priority for them this year was dealing with giant hogweed but said they were aware of the spread of Himalayan balsam.
Mr Rider, 78, said: "If anyone touches giant hogweed, it can cause very nasty skin sores which can be very dif-ficult to heal, yet the Cross Keys has a play area close to this field and lots of guests with children stay in the hotel.
"There's giant hogweed, which we focus on during the early summer months; Himalayan balsam, which we are currently tackling; and then Japanese knotweed, which we move on to later in the year.
In the UK there are two types of hogweed - common hogweed, the less dangerous of the two, and giant hogweed.
David Mercer Dunblane Hogweed blame lies with Holyrood Dear Editor On reading last week's Observers, it's clear that the Scottish Government is lacking urgency and commitment in eradicating the pernicious giant hogweed from the countryside.
A WARNING has been issued after giant hogweed was spotted in Meltham.
Woodland and coastal shingle habitats on the site are under threat from Himalayan balsam, Japanese knotweed and giant hogweed, which can cause severe skin burns.
Giant hogweed, or Heracleum mantegazzianum, is a weed which has dangerous effects on human health, particularly children.
His blistering comes at a time of year when giant hogweed, or Heracleum mantegazzianum, is returning to the British countryside, due to the warm weather.
Giant hogweed was among the foreign plants introduced to Britain in the 19th century as an ornamental plant, but it's now widespread throughout the British Isles.
But be sure not to mistake common hogweed for its big brother giant hogweed. Giant hogweed can grow up to five metres tall, has a thick green stem and white flowers clustered in an umbrella-shaped head that is up to 80cm in diameter.
A COUNCIL may employ four people as part of a PS300,000 plan to tackle destructive plants, including Japanese knotweed, Himalayan balsam and giant hogweed.