giantess

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gi·ant·ess

 (jī′ən-tĭs)
n.
A female giant.

gi•ant•ess

(ˈdʒaɪ ən tɪs)

n.
1. (in folklore) a female being of human form but superhuman size and strength.
2. any very large woman.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.giantess - a female giantgiantess - a female giant      
giant - an imaginary figure of superhuman size and strength; appears in folklore and fairy tales
Translations

giantess

[ˈdʒaɪənˈtes] Ngiganta f

giantess

[ˈdʒaɪəntɛs] ngéante fgiant killer nvainqueur m surprise (équipe de second plan qui parvient à battre une grande équipe)giant-killing [ˈdʒaɪəntkɪlɪŋ] n (mainly British)victoire f surprisegiant size giant-sized [ˈdʒaɪəntsaɪzd] adj [packet] → géant(e)

giantess

nRiesin f
References in classic literature ?
With these words he handed the Herd-boy a belt, and walking on in front he led him to a fountain where hundreds of Giants and Giantesses were assembled preparing to hold a wedding.
The normal limit of such a board is ten thousand wires, and will always remain so, unless a race of long-armed giantesses should appear, who would be able to reach over a greater expanse of board.
Grungy' nicely describes the quality of those early works, wobbly giantesses, with graffiti-like words incised on their skin.
Although giantesses of their time, Aquitania's two older half-sisters, Mauretania and Lusitania, were built primarily for speed when steamships were the fastest means for people, perishables and post to cross the oceans.
of Silesia, Poland) defines this diversity and the desire caused by it in examples from Middle English texts, including ethnic differences (perceived and real); community, Richard le Coer de Lion, and chivalric anthropology; bodies enslaved in Aucassin et Nicolete and Floris and Blancheflour; black giantesses as communal flesh in the Firumbras romances; genealogy and desire in King Horn; and transformation and regeneration in Kyng Alisaunder and The wars of Alexander.
The exhibition, organized by theme rather than chronology, draws on Carrington's writings and suggests some Irish folkloric roots for the mind-melting, fantastical imagery--from egg-guarding giantesses to bird-headed sages--for which this painter came to be known.
is an intriguing discussion of one of history's literary giantesses.
In the Iberian romances, giantesses abound, but they are scarcely different from ordinary human women.