giaour


Also found in: Wikipedia.

giaour

 (jour)
n. Often Offensive
A person who is not a believer in Islam.

[French, from Italian dialectal (Venetian) giaur (with gi- representing palatalized g- in Ottoman Turkish gâvur), from Ottoman Turkish gâvur, alteration of earlier gebr, from Persian gabr, infidel, Zoroastrian, from Arabic kāfir, infidel, from kafr, village, from Aramaic kaprā; see kpr in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

giaour

(ˈdʒaʊə)
n
(Islam) a derogatory term for a non-Muslim, esp a Christian, used esp by the Turks
[C16: from Turkish giaur unbeliever, from Persian gaur, variant of gäbr]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

giaour

(dʒaʊr)

n.
(in Islam) a nonbeliever, esp. a Christian.
[1555–65; earlier gower, gour < Turkish gâvur < Persian gaur, variant of gabr Zoroastrian, non-Muslim]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
giaurro
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
He followed up his first literary success by publishing during the next four years his brief and vigorous metrical romances, most of them Eastern in setting, 'The Giaour' (pronounced by Byron 'Jower'), 'The Bride of Abydos,' 'The Corsair,' 'Lara,' 'The Siege of Corinth,' and 'Parisina.' These were composed not only with remarkable facility but in the utmost haste, sometimes a whole poem in only a few days and sometimes in odds and ends of time snatched from social diversions.
Combat of the Giaour and Hassan, 1835, Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863), oil on canvas, 74x60cm.
Jager returns to the emotions in his analysis of Byron's The Giaour by asking whether "human love [is] the opposite of religion or another version of it?" (191).
Shelley (his Prometheus), Mary Shelley (Frankenstein and his Creature), Lord Byron (Manfred, Cain, Lara, the Giaour, Sardanapalus, Prometheus, etc.), John Keats (his Titans).
After his departure, Tatyana enters his library, finds there "Lord Byron's portrait on the wall" (7.19) as, though Eugene had "ruled out reading", a few writers "had escaped disgrace" and "Don Juan's and the Giaour's creator" was one of them (7.22).
Austen's views of Byron are manifested in her correspondence, where she equates reading The Corsair With mending her petticoat (5-8 March 1814), and in Persuasion, where Byron's Oriental tale The Giaour is the favorite reading of the sentimental and ultimately inconstant Captain Benwick, who, although initially devastated by the death of his fiancee, is in fact soon converted to the alternative charms of Louisa Musgrove.
(25) Spike is reminiscent of the 'Byronic image of a solitary wanderer in a perpetual state of exile'.26 He is a type of Giaour: 'a degenerate figure who is more destructive than creative, more a problem to national identity than a solution'.
TATYANA The Bard of Juan and the Giaour (Turns the book over so the text is face-up.
Delacroix's paintings of battles and massacres, such as the Massacre at Chios (1824), or the Combat of the Giaour and the Pasha (1827), or the famous series of Lion Hunts (1855-1861) appealed to Baudelaire who admired Delacroix's art of violence, dream, and the imagination.
A few months later Murray offered Byron the princely sum of a thousand guineas for "The Giaour" and "The Bride of Abydos" and soon after paid Dallas 500 [pounds sterling] for "The Corsair." Early in 1814, sensing that Byron took a greater interest in his growing fame than in the money it was generating, Murray wrote to him effusively describing the response to the publication of these works: