giaour


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giaour

 (jour)
n. Often Offensive
A person who is not a believer in Islam.

[French, from Italian dialectal (Venetian) giaur (with gi- representing palatalized g- in Ottoman Turkish gâvur), from Ottoman Turkish gâvur, alteration of earlier gebr, from Persian gabr, infidel, Zoroastrian, from Arabic kāfir, infidel, from kafr, village, from Aramaic kaprā; see kpr in Semitic roots.]

giaour

(ˈdʒaʊə)
n
(Islam) a derogatory term for a non-Muslim, esp a Christian, used esp by the Turks
[C16: from Turkish giaur unbeliever, from Persian gaur, variant of gäbr]

giaour

(dʒaʊr)

n.
(in Islam) a nonbeliever, esp. a Christian.
[1555–65; earlier gower, gour < Turkish gâvur < Persian gaur, variant of gabr Zoroastrian, non-Muslim]
Translations
giaurro
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References in periodicals archive ?
Shelley (his Prometheus), Mary Shelley (Frankenstein and his Creature), Lord Byron (Manfred, Cain, Lara, the Giaour, Sardanapalus, Prometheus, etc.
En el Peru aparecio en el Correo Mercantil, Politico-Literario de Lima, el 23 de junio de 1822, un texto anonimo titulado Traduccion La Grecia, que la Eva Latorre califica de libre recreacion de unos versos de The Giaour de Lord Byron.
11) Between 1813 and 1816, Byron published a series of popular Oriental tales in verse including The Giaour, The Bride of Abydos, The Corsair, Lara, and The Siege of Corinth.
Austen's views of Byron are manifested in her correspondence, where she equates reading The Corsair With mending her petticoat (5-8 March 1814), and in Persuasion, where Byron's Oriental tale The Giaour is the favorite reading of the sentimental and ultimately inconstant Captain Benwick, who, although initially devastated by the death of his fiancee, is in fact soon converted to the alternative charms of Louisa Musgrove.
TATYANA The Bard of Juan and the Giaour (Turns the book over so the text is face-up.
Delacroix's paintings of battles and massacres, such as the Massacre at Chios (1824), or the Combat of the Giaour and the Pasha (1827), or the famous series of Lion Hunts (1855-1861) appealed to Baudelaire who admired Delacroix's art of violence, dream, and the imagination.
Thus, the Giaour embodies a queer identity that cannot be definitely fixed; the two princes episode introduces transvestism, and Vathek himself is presented as an example of "hyperbolical masculinity" (74).
Turin's autonomy of the will is the primary trait that he shares with virtually every Byronic Hero from Cain to Giaour, for throughout The Children of Hurin, he is painted as "invariably fiery, passionate, and heroic; he is in the true sense bigger than the life around him" (68).
SOUP DE GIAOUR Christian served up by Turkish cannibals
They are at last introduced by a subordinate fiend, the Giaour, to the famous Halls of Eblis where after a short interval they meet with their due reward, the eternal torture of a burning heart as they wander amid riches, splendours, opportunities of knowledge and all the other treacherous and bootless gifts of hell.
Byron was writing to Murray concerning his late-night reading on Saturday, 4 December 1813, two days after the publication of his second Turkish Tale, The Bride of Abydos; a day after reading a 'very savage but certainly uncommonly well written' review of The Giaour, his still-serpentining first, in the Christian Observer; and in the midst of worrying whether Mohammed was buried at Mecca or Medina.
jealousy, Antony for impetuousness, the Giaour for melancholy, and the Corsair for solipsistic dependence on self.