gift of tongues


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Related to gift of tongues: speaking in tongues

gift of tongues

n.
The ability or phenomenon of spontaneous, ecstatic speech in no known language or in a language unknown to the speaker, considered as a charismatic gift in certain Christian denominations. Also called glossolalia, speaking in tongues.

[From the Apostles' speaking in tongues in Acts 2:4.]

gift of tongues

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) an utterance, partly or wholly unintelligible, believed by some to be produced under the influence of ecstatic religious emotion and conceived to be a manifestation of the Holy Ghost: practised in certain Christian churches, usually called Pentecostal. Also called: glossolalia

speak′ing in tongues′


n.
a form of glossolalia in which a person experiencing religious ecstasy utters incomprehensible sounds believed to be of divine inspiration. Also called gift of tongues.
References in classic literature ?
But Jerry, four-legged, smooth-coated, Irish terrier that he was, had the gift of tongues. If he could not teach languages, at least he could learn languages.
People, who finding out they have no ambition in life by way of trade or profession, get hold of a Bible, scream some strange words they themselves do not understand, and claim they have the gift of tongues, therefore, they are gifted by the Holy Spirit to lead the flock of Jesus.
Is the gift of tongues thus a charism to miraculously speak other languages?
He doesn't give us precise details about the group's gift of tongues, but reading between the lines, we remember that the women and men it happened to were part of a tight-knit group who had traveled together and shared their faith and hope in Jesus.
The book is the culmination of years of study, application, and personal experience in areas operating in the gifts of the Holy Spirit, prophecies, the gift of tongues, and the gift of impartation.
Between the jagged tooth of dogfish he placed the holy gift of tongues,
The three key language-related Bible passages (Gen 11.1-9 on the tower of Babel, Acts 2 on the beginning of the Eschaton, and 1 Cor 14.6-12, where Paul writes on the gift of tongues) provide the biblical framework for Bibliander's views on language and theology (XXV).
Edited by Dai Smith, the two collections range from Arthur Machen's The Gift of Tongues, Rhys Davies' Dark World and Caradoc Evans' The Coffin to Leonora Brito's Dat's Love, Gee Williams' Blood Etc and Rachel Trezise's Fresh Apples.
As well as the gift of curry he has the gift of tongues being fluent in Hindi, Gujerati, Nepal, Punjabi, Urdu and Arabic.
(23) In the context of Gregory's work, this elaboration of the gifts of the Holy Spirit hearkens back to the signs which Christ promises his followers in the passage from Mark 16 with which he began, (24) and looks forward to his next homily on Pentecost, focusing on the Holy Spirit's gift of tongues as a restoration of the "communionem unius linguae" [communion of one language] that had been lost at Babel.
He examines possible Pentecostal contributions to current conversations between theology and science, mentioning glossolalia, the gift of tongues, a significant charism in Pentecostal theology, as a kind of leitmotiv for the diversity that could genuinely inform theological dialogues rooted in pneumatology.
The Gift of Tongues: Women's Xenoglossia in the Later Middle Ages.