gigaflop


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Related to gigaflop: terabyte, megaflop

gig·a·flops

 (gĭg′ə-flŏps′, jĭg′-) or gig·a·flop (-flŏp′)
n. pl. gigaflops
A measure of computing speed equal to one billion floating-point operations per second.

gigaflop

(ˈɡɪɡəˌflɒp; ˈɡaɪɡəˌflɒp)
n
(Computer Science) computing a measure of processing speed, consisting of a thousand million floating-point operations a second
[C20: from giga- + flo(ating) p(oint)]
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References in periodicals archive ?
An up-to-date phone probably performs at around a gigaflop, a measurement just one step down from Data's teraflops--and people carry that device in their pocket.
For example, NVIDIA claims their new K1 processor for the mobile and tablet market can deliver 360 gigaflop per second (billion floating-point operations per second) while consuming one watt of power.
The use of these characters only enhanced the contrast between the state of the art cardboard cutout technology then, and the fifty million Gigaflop (yes, that's a real term) needed for the photo-realist rendering of today's masterpiece Shrek.
These chips have also brought PCs to the level of gigaflop (billion floating point ops/sec) performance.
One Gigaflop equals one billion floating-point operations per second.
Key technology features incorporated in the system include a high dynamic range receiver, high performance analog-to-digital converters, high throughput (on the order of one Gigaflop) high speed signal processing, extensive use of thin-layer and macrohybrid circuitry, a redundant architecture and a full BIT capability.
Many forward-looking thinkers would feel safer if the destiny of the earth were entrusted to a gigaflop rather than to President Reagan, but traditionalists like former British Foreign Secretary Sir Geoffrey Howe are not among them.
For comparison, your desktop computer probably runs on the gigaflop level, able to perform billions of calculations per second.
Argonne has acquired IBM's 16 gigaflop POWERparallel system--the most powerful parallel system ever installed to carry out research.
Twenty teams of researchers whose engineering application codes run on Cray supercomputers at speeds of at least 1 billion floating-point operations per seconds (gigaflops) received Cray Gigaflop Performance Awards late last year at the Supercomputing '89 conference in Reno, Nev.