gingiva


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Related to gingiva: attached gingiva

gin·gi·va

 (jĭn′jə-və, jĭn-jī′-)
n. pl. gin·gi·vae (-vē′)
See gum2.

[Latin gingīva.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gingiva

(ˈdʒɪndʒɪvə; dʒɪnˈdʒaɪvə)
n, pl -givae (-dʒɪˌviː; -ˈdʒaɪviː)
(Anatomy) anatomy the technical name for gum2
[from Latin]
ˈgingival adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gum1

(gʌm)

n., v. gummed, gum•ming. n.
1. any of various viscid, amorphous exudations from plants, hardening on exposure to air and soluble in or forming a viscid mass with water.
2. any of various similar exudations, as resin.
3. a sticky, adhesive preparation of such a plant substance, as for use in the arts or bookbinding.
6. the adhesive by which a postage stamp is affixed.
v.t.
7. to smear, stiffen, or stick together with gum.
8. to clog with or as if with a gummy substance.
v.i.
9. to exude or form gum.
10. to become gummy.
11. to become clogged with a gummy substance.
12. gum up, Slang. to spoil or ruin.
[1350–1400; gomme < Old French « Latin gummi, cummi < Greek kómmi < Egyptian kmyt]
gum′less, adj.

gum2

(gʌm)

n., v. gummed, gum•ming. n.
1. Often, gums. Also called gingiva. the firm, fleshy tissue covering the surfaces of the jaws and enveloping the necks of the teeth.
v.t.
2. to masticate with toothless gums.
3. to shape or renew the teeth of (a saw).
[1275–1325; Middle English gome, Old English gōma palate; akin to Old High German guomo, Old Norse gōmr palate]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gin·gi·va

(jĭn′jə-və)
The gums of the mouth. ♦ Inflammation of the gums is called gingivitis (jĭn′jə-vī′tĭs).
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gingiva - the tissue (covered by mucous membrane) of the jaws that surrounds the bases of the teethgingiva - the tissue (covered by mucous membrane) of the jaws that surrounds the bases of the teeth
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
mouth, oral cavity, oral fissure, rima oris - the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge; "he stuffed his mouth with candy"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

gingiva

n (pl -vae) encía
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Buccal mucosa (30.1%) was the most common site involved in our study, followed by tongue (28%), tonsil (14.5%), palate (12.6%), gingiva (4.8%) and lip (3.8%).
Oral examination revealed poor hygiene with pale pink, enlarged, and firm gingiva that bled on probing.
The five most common oral manifestations reported by the patients were lip hyperplasia (53%), stained gingiva (47%), malocclusion (30%), bleeding gingiva (27%), and spacing between teeth (23%).
Increase in size of the gingiva is a common feature of the gingival disease and is termed as gingival enlargement.
The chronic infection damages the gingiva (soft tissues around the teeth) tooth ligaments and the underlying bone.
These researchers found that uneven gingiva had the worst perception in periodontal aesthetic, however, the perception of localized and generalized gingival recession did not differ significantly.
This irritates the gingiva. Over time, the gum gets swollen and bleeds easily; we call this gingivitis.
Second, we discovered in 2009 that the gingiva contains mesenchymal stem cells and that they can do a lot of good therapeutically.
Such tooth movements enhance susceptibility to gingival recession particularly in individuals with thin gingival biotype due to the gingiva losing its alveolar bone support (4, 5).
In this procedure, the gingiva (free gingiva and attached gingiva) is separated from the underlying alveolar bone in order to debride root surfaces that are too deep to be accessed with traditional methods.
Acute streptococcal gingivitis is a rare condition characterised by a diffuse erythema of the gingiva and the pathogenesis and prognosis of this oral disease is different from routine plaque-associated gingivitis.1,2 Bacterial smears show a preponderance of streptococcal forms, which were identified as streptococcus viridians, but recently group A b-haemolytic streptococcus is reported.3-5Streptococcal gingivitis is usually seen with throat infections caused by streptoccus.6 This disease is characterised by swollen bright-red gingiva associated with pain, fever, malaise, and submandibular lymphadenitis.