gingival

(redirected from gingival disease)
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Related to gingival disease: periodontal disease

gin·gi·val

 (jĭn′jə-vəl, jĭn-jī′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the gums.
2. Linguistics Alveolar.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gingival - of or relating to the gums
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Translations

gin·gi·val

a. gingival, rel. a la gingiva.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Research has established that regular use of Miswak has a therapeutic effect on gingival disease, and acts against multiple gum disease causing organisms such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans etcetera.
Limited studies (with the different assays) have previously investigated the lactoferrin level or [alpha]1-antitrypsin level in saliva and in gingival crevicular fluid for periodontal disease and gingival disease [15-19].
A Clinical and microbiological examination of gingival disease in prepubescent females.
The gingival disease can be broadly classified into dental plaque induced and non-plaque induced gingival disease.
Although in vitro studies published about the interaction between the OPCs and pathogens in the oral cavity have had very good results, there are no publications with the appropriate design to assess the clinical efficacy of OPCs in gingival disease in human, except an article published in 2015 comparing the chlorhexidine and the cranberry mouthwash [22-25].
Although only 21 patients were enrolled in this study (11 with gingival disease), it was interesting to learn how replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) was promoted by small fatty acid byproducts of two bacteria prevalent in gum disease.
Gingival disease. In: Bimstein E Needleman H Karimbux N VanDyke T (eds).
In a manner similar to that seen in people, this buildup is often associated with dental or gingival disease. (The gingiva is a fancy word for the gums.) Plaque, a relatively soft and easily removed material, occurs when bacteria sticks to the teeth.