gird

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gird 1

 (gûrd)
v. gird·ed or girt (gûrt), gird·ing, girds
v.tr.
1.
a. To encircle (a person or the part of the body) with a belt or band.
b. To fasten or secure (clothing, for example) with a belt or band.
c. To surround.
2. To prepare (oneself) for action.
v.intr.
To prepare for action: "Men still spoke of peace but girded more sternly for war" (W. Bruce Lincoln).
Idiom:
gird (up) (one's) loins
To summon up one's inner resources in preparation for action.

[Middle English girden, from Old English gyrdan; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]

gird 2

 (gûrd)
intr. & tr.v. gird·ed, gird·ing, girds
To jeer or jeer at.
n.
A sarcastic remark.

[Middle English girden, to strike.]

gird

(ɡɜːd)
vb (tr) , girds, girding, girded or girt
1. to put a belt, girdle, etc, around (the waist or hips)
2. to bind or secure with or as if with a belt: to gird on one's armour.
3. to surround; encircle
4. to prepare (oneself) for action (esp in the phrase gird (up) one's loins)
5. to endow with a rank, attribute, etc, esp knighthood
[Old English gyrdan, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse gyrtha, Old High German gurten]

gird

(ɡɜːd)
vb
1. (when: intr, foll by at) to jeer (at someone); mock
2. (tr) to strike (a blow at someone)
3. (intr) to move at high speed
n
4.
a. a blow or stroke
b. a taunt; gibe
5. a display of bad temper or anger (esp in the phrases in a gird; throw a gird)
[C13 girden to strike, cut, of unknown origin]

gird

(ɡɪrd)
n
Scot a hoop, esp a child's hoop. Also: girr
[a Scot variant of girth]

gird1

(gɜrd)

v.t. girded or girt, gird•ing.
1. to encircle or bind with a belt or band.
2. to surround; enclose; hem in.
3. to prepare (oneself) for action; brace.
4. to equip or invest, as with power or strength.
Idioms:
gird (up) one's loins, to prepare oneself for something requiring strength or endurance.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English gyrdan, c. Old Saxon gurdian, Old High German gurten, Old Norse gyrtha]
gird′ing•ly, adv.

gird2

(gɜrd)
v.i.
1. to gibe; jeer (usu. fol. by at).
v.t.
2. to gibe or jeer at; taunt.
n.
3. a gibe.
[1175-1225;Middle English gyrd a stroke, blow, hence a cutting remark, derivative of girden to strike, of obscure orig.]

gird


Past participle: girded/girt
Gerund: girding

Imperative
gird
gird
Present
I gird
you gird
he/she/it girds
we gird
you gird
they gird
Preterite
I girded/girt
you girded/girt
he/she/it girded/girt
we girded/girt
you girded/girt
they girded/girt
Present Continuous
I am girding
you are girding
he/she/it is girding
we are girding
you are girding
they are girding
Present Perfect
I have girded/girt
you have girded/girt
he/she/it has girded/girt
we have girded/girt
you have girded/girt
they have girded/girt
Past Continuous
I was girding
you were girding
he/she/it was girding
we were girding
you were girding
they were girding
Past Perfect
I had girded/girt
you had girded/girt
he/she/it had girded/girt
we had girded/girt
you had girded/girt
they had girded/girt
Future
I will gird
you will gird
he/she/it will gird
we will gird
you will gird
they will gird
Future Perfect
I will have girded/girt
you will have girded/girt
he/she/it will have girded/girt
we will have girded/girt
you will have girded/girt
they will have girded/girt
Future Continuous
I will be girding
you will be girding
he/she/it will be girding
we will be girding
you will be girding
they will be girding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been girding
you have been girding
he/she/it has been girding
we have been girding
you have been girding
they have been girding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been girding
you will have been girding
he/she/it will have been girding
we will have been girding
you will have been girding
they will have been girding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been girding
you had been girding
he/she/it had been girding
we had been girding
you had been girding
they had been girding
Conditional
I would gird
you would gird
he/she/it would gird
we would gird
you would gird
they would gird
Past Conditional
I would have girded/girt
you would have girded/girt
he/she/it would have girded/girt
we would have girded/girt
you would have girded/girt
they would have girded/girt
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.gird - prepare oneself for a military confrontation; "The U.S. is girding for a conflict in the Middle East"; "troops are building up on the Iraqi border"
re-arm, rearm - arm anew; "After the war, the defeated country was not allowed to rearm"
forearm - arm in advance of a confrontation
2.gird - put a girdle on or around; "gird your loins"
border, environ, surround, skirt, ring - extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle; "The forest surrounds my property"
3.gird - bind with something round or circular
hoop - bind or fasten with a hoop; "hoop vats"
bind - make fast; tie or secure, with or as if with a rope; "The Chinese would bind the feet of their women"

gird

verb
1. girdle, bind, belt The other knights urged Galahad to gird on his sword.
2. surround, ring, pen, enclose, encompass, encircle, hem in, enfold, engird a proposal to gird the river with a series of small hydroelectric dams
3. prepare, ready, steel, brace, fortify, make or get ready They are girding themselves for battle against a new enemy.

gird

verb
1. To encircle with or as if with a band:
Archaic: engird.
2. To shut in on all sides:
3. To present with a quality, trait, or power:
4. To prepare (oneself) for action:
Translations

gird

[gɜːd] (girded (girt (pt, pp))) VT (liter) → ceñir, rodear (with de) to gird o.s. for the fight or frayaprestarse para la lucha
to gird (up) one's loinsaprestarse para la lucha
see also loin
gird on VT + ADV to gird on one's swordceñirse la espada

gird

[ˈgɜːrd] vt
to gird o.s. for sth [+ battle, contest] → se préparer à or pour qch

gird

pret, ptp <girded or (rare) girt>
vt (old)gürten (old); (fig)umgeben; to gird oneselfsich gürten (with mit); (fig: = prepare) → sich wappnen; (→ für)
References in periodicals archive ?
The average GIRD for symptomatic pitchers was 19.7[degrees] +/12.8[degrees], while the GIRD for asymptomatic pitchers was 11.1[degrees] +/-9.4[degrees].
20, 1971, titled "Catholics Gird for Fight Against Abortion Reform." When I read "The right of a woman to her own body is subordinate to the right of a child to life," I thought this is why my friend's mother (and fetus) chose to die a good Catholic rather than sign to have a safe legal abortion back in 1949.
Even during the 1961 Berlin crisis when Kennedy warned the nation to gird for nuclear Armageddon, the response proved tepid.