git


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git 1

(gĭt)
v. Chiefly New England, Midland US, & Southern US
Variant of get1.

git 2

(gĭt)
n. Chiefly British Slang
An unpleasant, contemptible, or frustratingly obtuse person.

[Variant of get, offspring, bastard, contemptible person; see get1.]

git

(ɡɪt)
n
1. a contemptible person, often a fool
2. a bastard
[C20: from get (in the sense: to beget, hence a bastard, fool)]

git

(gɪt)

v. Dial.
get.
pron: See get.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.git - a person who is deemed to be despicable or contemptiblegit - a person who is deemed to be despicable or contemptible; "only a rotter would do that"; "kill the rat"; "throw the bum out"; "you cowardly little pukes!"; "the British call a contemptible person a `git'"
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
Translations

git

[gɪt] N (Brit) → cretino/a m/f

git

[ˈgɪt] n (British)con(ne) m/f

git

n (inf: = stupid person) → Schwachkopf m, → Depp m (dial); a miserable old gitein alter Miesepeter (inf)
References in classic literature ?
The only way to git him to do anything is to coax him to do the opposite.
She makes me get up just at the same time every morning; she makes me wash, they comb me all to thunder; she won't let me sleep in the woodshed; I got to wear them blamed clothes that just smothers me, Tom; they don't seem to any air git through 'em, somehow; and they're so rotten nice that I can't set down, nor lay down, nor roll around anywher's; I hain't slid on a cellar-door for -- well, it 'pears to be years; I got to go to church and sweat and sweat -- I hate them ornery sermons!
Well, I'd got to talk so nice it wasn't no comfort -- I'd got to go up in the attic and rip out awhile, every day, to git a taste in my mouth, or I'd a died, Tom.
We thought we'd lost forty-two men by straight count, but if they keep on a-comin' this way, we'll git th' comp'ny all back by mornin' yit.
An' yeh may git a lot 'a other sicknesses, too, by mornin'.
"Pap's so po' he cain't run me no mo', so I want to git a show somers if I kin, 'taint no diffunce what--I'm strong and hearty, and I don't turn my back on no kind of work, hard nur soft."
`How does the little Temperance girl git along?' asks mother.
At the hearin' of this, ye may swear, though, I was as mad as a grasshopper, but I remimbered that I was Sir Pathrick O'Grandison, Barronitt, and that it wasn't althegither gentaal to lit the anger git the upper hand o' the purliteness, so I made light o' the matter and kipt dark, and got quite sociable wid the little chap, and afther a while what did he do but ask me to go wid him to the widdy's, saying he wud give me the feshionable inthroduction to her leddyship.
When I come nights I can't git no rest 'cause yer allus poundin' a kid.
"De fac' is, ole marster kin git along better when young marster's away den he kin when he's in de town; yes, en he love him better, too; so he gives him fifty dollahs a month--"
"Haul up, Penn," he said, laughing, "er she 'll git stuck again."
De white one gits him to go right a little while, den de black one sail in en bust it all up.