givenness


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givenness

(ˈɡɪvənˌnɪs)
n
the actuality of being given
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.givenness - the quality of being granted as a supposition; of being acknowledged or assumed
indisputability, indubitability, unquestionability, unquestionableness - the quality of being beyond question or dispute or doubt
References in periodicals archive ?
As in her last book, The Givenness of Things, Robinson doesn't flinch from engagement with deep aspects of Christian theology, something that may be a difficulty for more casual readers.
It defines itself by a "titanic and deliberate effort to undo by technology, rationality, and government the givenness of what came down from the past.
We interviewed Robinson via email, and our questions referred specifically to three of her works: her 2004 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Gilead, narrated by the elderly preacher John Ames, and the essays "Proofs" and "Humanism," from her 2015 collection, The Givenness of Things.
Since the givenness of objects is withheld from our perception, we must deal with images and with a set of relations, alignments, and orientations that close the gap between one's perception of the object and the impossible futurity of the thing's secret self-fruition.
40) But the problem is that, in Agamben's curio cabinet, both life and machine remain undefined in the givenness of their presentation within the collection, and it is precisely this lack of clarity which, from a Hegelian perspective that derives the determinacy of life from that of mechanism by demonstrating the unsustainability of the latter, prevents an articulation of the ontological structure of life from getting underway in the first place.
Building on Manfred Frank's discussion of the Fichte-Studien, Trap reconstructs Novalis's rejection of Fichte's account of an originary self-positing I, instead proposing a pre-reflective feeling ("Gefuhl") in touch with the undifferentiated givenness of Being, referred to by Frank as a kind of "beziehungslose Vertrautheit.
Her nonfiction titles include the essay collections The Givenness of Things, When I Was a Child I Read Books, Absence of Mind, The Death of Adam and an environmental wake-up call titled Mother Country.
The foci of these different literatures are related to some inscription of human interest that remains ironically outside of history; and requires accepting the givenness of its subjects as a transcendental object that becomes the origin of change (see Popkewitz, 2013).
The Givenness of Things: Essays, by Marilynne Robinson.
To summarize the approaches of Hart and Manoussakis we could present the following points of the aesthetic theology that could be applied for film analysis: 1) the givenness and unexpected vision of Beauty; 2) personal rather than conceptual experience of Beauty; 3) Beauty evokes desire and response to the transcendental; 4) Beauty bridges the transcendent and the immanent and creates the experience of distance; 5) Beauty is life-giving and life-preserving.
THE GIVENNESS OF THINGS: ESSAYS By Marilynne Robinson Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 304 pages, $26
Scholars from Europe, Africa, and Malaysia describe the acquisition of English vowels and consonants and their distribution in syllables and the acquisition of English prosody, discussing rhoticity in Brunei English and Malaysian English, the acquisition of voice onset time, the vowel perception of Polish children who moved to Ireland, the realization of English loanwords in Bangla (Bengali), the production of onset clusters by Nigerian speakers of English, the acquisition of speech rhythm in German and Mandarin Chinese speakers of English, the perception and production of stress placement in English, and prosodic strategies of marking focus and givenness in South African English.