glaciation

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gla·ci·ate

 (glā′shē-āt′, -sē-)
tr.v. gla·ci·at·ed, gla·ci·at·ing, gla·ci·ates
1.
a. To cover with ice or a glacier.
b. To subject to or affect by glacial action.
2. To freeze.

[Latin glaciāre, glaciāt-, to freeze, from glaciēs, ice; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

gla′ci·a′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glaciation

1. The effects on land of ice sheets or glaciers that erode rocks and deposit the rock debris.
2. A time when ice sheets develop and spread.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glaciation - the condition of being covered with glaciers or masses of iceglaciation - the condition of being covered with glaciers or masses of ice; the result of glacial action; "Agassiz recognized marks of glaciation all over northern Europe"
environmental condition - the state of the environment
2.glaciation - the process of covering the earth with glaciers or masses of ice
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
Riss glaciation - the next-to-last Pleistocene glaciation in the Alps and the deposits laid down at that time
Saale glaciation - the next-to-last Pleistocene glaciation in northern Europe and the deposits laid down at that time
Wolstonian glaciation - the next-to-last Pleistocene glaciation in Britain and the deposits laid down at that time
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

glaciation

[ˌgleɪsɪˈeɪʃən] Nglaciación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glaciation

[ˌgleɪsiˈeɪʃən] n
(= process) → glaciation f
(= period) → glaciation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glaciation

[ˌgleɪsɪˈeɪʃn] nglaciazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The question of how life survived these 'Snowball Earth' glaciations has puzzled scientists for many decades.
Glaciations are known to have a large and long-lasting impact on groundwater flow.
Geologically speaking, the planet has been undergoing a period of intense climatic change over the past 3 million years - These are known as Ice Ages or Glaciations. These dramatic cyclical changes from hot to cold can take anywhere between 50,000 to 100,000 years to complete.
La presence humaine sur son sol correspond a l'epoque des dernieres glaciations en Europe.
Towards the head of the valley the beck runs through a steep sided forested gorge, gouged out by glaciations after the last ice age.
Glaciations have occurred while C[O.sub.2] levels were, according to some models, 10 times higher than they are currently, and the modern low C[O.sub.2] levels during the current glaciation are abnormal when compared to historic levels during glaciations.
Burgess said that if the greenhouse gas composition of the atmosphere was comparable to current levels then the Earth should have been permanently glaciated but geological evidence suggests there were no global glaciations before the end of the Archean and that liquid water was widespread.
"a[bar]Year by year all the way to the end of the last glaciations."
By carving wide valleys into mountain landscapes, glaciers such as Switzerland's Aletsch Glacier (shown) prime a region for even more extensive glaciations in the future, researchers report in the Jan.
We test the prediction that sea-level fluctuations in the course of the Pleistocene glaciations increased speciation rates.