glaciology

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gla·ci·ol·o·gy

 (glā′shē-ŏl′ə-jē, -sē-)
n.
The scientific study of glaciers and their effects on the landscape.


gla′ci·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), gla′ci·o·log′i·cal adj.
gla′ci·ol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glaciology

(ˌɡlæsɪˈɒlədʒɪ; ˌɡleɪ-)
n
(Physical Geography) the study of the distribution, character, and effects of glaciers
glaciological, ˌglacioˈlogic adj
ˌglaciˈologist, ˈglacialist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gla•ci•ol•o•gy

(ˌgleɪ ʃiˈɒl ə dʒi, -si-)

n.
the branch of geology that deals with the nature, distribution, and action of glaciers and their effect on the earth's topography.
[1890–95; glaci (er) + -o- + -logy]
gla`ci•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
gla`ci•ol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

glaciology

the branch of geology that studies the nature, distribution, and movement of glaciers and their effects upon the earth’s topography. — glaciologist, n.glaciological, adj.
See also: Geology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

glaciology

[ˌglæsɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nglaciología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glaciology

nGletscherkunde f, → Glaziologie f (form)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
Because the glaciers were in lake basins, they rested on fine-grained sediment well-lubricated with water, and this low-resistive state (Clarke 1987) likely aided the glaciers ability to respond quickly to variations in climatic conditions and/or glaciologic controls.