glancingly


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glanc·ing

 (glăn′sĭng)
adj.
1. Oblique in direction; slanting or deflected: struck him a glancing blow.
2. Not straightforward; indirect: made glancing allusions to the scandal.

glanc′ing·ly adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Rocketman' cares only glancingly about either, as it makes clear with its opening sequence, which finds John in a bright orange, sequined, devil outfit walking in slow motion toward what we assume is a stage.
Also, DiFranco only glancingly mentions her two children--Petah and Dante.
He was working in another, completely different area and against our interests." That 2002 Times report referred to "Al Qaeda, which has in the past mentioned the Palestinian issue only glancingly."
The type of nomadic equestrian culture he depicts, in a remote and pristine part of the world, might glancingly seem familiar from such Mongolian features as The Story of the Weeping Camel and The Cave of the Yellow Dog, but this period saga is spun around a specifically Kyrgyzstani history.
Dubois refers only once, and glancingly, to William James's Varieties of Religious Experience (1902), surely a key text for Dubois's topic.
"It's easy to be hard-boiled in the daytime -- but at night..." A film infused with that soft, yielding night-time sensuality, artists in 1920s Paris acting out a fable on the value of Art -- but also a rueful romantic pastiche full of glancingly funny moments.
Mueller's active-duty military service, often mentioned glancingly in profiles about him, began in August 1967, when he began training at the Marine Corps Officer Candidates School at Quantico, Virginia.
In the scenarios for the revelation of truth in both the Ion and the Meno, access to divine knowledge is given to a subject who is, glancingly, more than human.
Amy Friedman has observed that "for decades women writers associated with the Beat Generation have been an ignored presence, only glancingly acknowledged as the critical fascination with the Beats continues to grow" (230).
"The book is a cleverly composed meditation on one privileged American's life--and, glancingly, on America--at a crucial moment for both.
Their "relationship," while only glancingly entertained inside Kraus's book--which gives details of Lotringer and Acker's sex life without ever mentioning that Lotringer and Kraus, too, were involved--is also absolutely frontal.