glasnost


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glas·nost

 (gläs′nôst′)
n.
An official policy of the former Soviet government emphasizing candor with regard to discussion of social problems and shortcomings.

[Russian glasnost', publicity, openness, from obsolete glas, voice, from Old Church Slavonic glasŭ; see gal- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glasnost

(ˈɡlæsˌnɒst)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the policy of public frankness and accountability developed in the former Soviet Union under the leadership of Mikhail Gorbachev
[C20: Russian, literally: openness]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glas•nost

(ˈglæz nɒst, ˈglɑz-)

n.
the declared public policy in the Soviet Union of openly and frankly discussing economic and political realities: initiated under Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985.
[1980–85; < Russian glásnost' literally, publicity (taken to mean openness)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

glasnost

1. A Russian word meaning openness, used especially to mean the policy of increased openness in government introduced under Gorbachev in the former Soviet Union.
2. A Russian word meaning openness. Set in motion in 1985 by Gorbachev, this policy meant that the intellectual atmosphere lightened and that contemporary social matters, politics, and the history of Stalinist era could be discussed.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glasnost - a policy of the Soviet government allowing freer discussion of social problems
social policy - a policy of for dealing with social issues
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

glasnost

[ˈglæznɔst] Nglasnost f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glasnost

[ˈglæznɒst] nglasnost f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glasnost

nGlasnost f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

glasnost

[ˈglæsˌnɒst] nglasnost f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Gorbachev introduced significant economic and political reforms, such as 'glasnost', meaning 'openness' in relation to freedom of speech and press, and 'perestroika', referring to the 'restructuring' of economic policy.
It was only with the Ukrainian revolution of 2014 and the subsequent conflict with Russia that Plokhy felt liberated to write about Chernobyl, in part because suddenly the catastrophe had been trumped by new dramas but also because he realised it could be seen as central to everything that followed -- glasnost in the Soviet Union, the growth of a nationalist movement in Ukraine, and the collapse five years after the disaster of the crumbling edifice of the Soviet empire.
Which Soviet leader intoduced the policies of glasnost and perestroika?
All those vowels that we thought meant a new world - glasnost and perestroika - have been replaced by a new language of war.
It would be a Crimea not to take this opportunity and he could even get his pal Elaine C Smith to do a special rendition of "Ah belong tae Glasnost" at a star-studded launch event.
was the Soviet leader under whom "glasnost" was |introduced?
GDon't worry because help is at hand with Glastonsbury alternative, The Glasnost Festival, has returned to The Moon Club and Full Moon Bar in Cardiff with a host of music, arts and performance.
Following an introduction (1-14), the primary text includes the following chapters: The Revolution, 1917-1919 (15-79); The Civil War, 1919-1921 (80-130); The New Economic Policy, 1921-1926 (131-248); Stalin Consolidates Power, 1926-1927 (249-91); The First Five-Year Plan, 1928-1932 (292-348); The Second Five-Year Plan and the Great Terror, 1933-1938 (349-445); The Great Patriotic War, 1939-1945 (446-80); The Cold War Begins, 1946-53 (481-520); The So-Called Thaw and Refrigeration, 1954-1963 (521-54); Innovation within Stagnation, 1964-1984 (555-647); Glasnost' and Perestroika, 1985-1992 (648-90).
Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev has warned of a new Cold War - "For the author of glasnost...
His glasnost reforms in the Soviet Union were seen as helping to pave
Which President of the USSR encouraged the policy of Glasnost? 2.
Gorbachev developed many new policies: The "Glasnost" program in 1986 and the "Perestroika" program in 1987, including the "New Thinking" about the role of the USSR in the world.