glazier


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glazier

a person who fits windows with glass or panes of glass
Not to be confused with:
glacier – a mass of slowly moving land ice formed by the accumulation of snow on high ground
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

gla·zier

 (glā′zhər)
n.
One who cuts and fits glass, as for doors and windows.

[Middle English glasier, from glas, glass; see glaze.]

gla′zier·y (-zhə-rē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glazier

(ˈɡleɪzɪə)
n
(Building) a person who glazes windows, etc
ˈglaziery n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gla•zier

(ˈgleɪ ʒər)

n.
a person who fits windows or the like with glass or panes of glass.
[1350–1400]
gla′zier•y, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glazier - someone who cuts flat glass to sizeglazier - someone who cuts flat glass to size
artisan, journeyman, artificer, craftsman - a skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
زَجّاج، مُرَكِّب الزُّجاج
sklenář
glarmester
glerskeri, glersmiîur
sklenár

glazier

[ˈgleɪzɪəʳ] Nvidriero/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glazier

[ˈgleɪzɪər] nvitrier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glazier

nGlaser(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

glazier

[ˈgleɪzɪəʳ] nvetraio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

glaze

(gleiz) verb
1. to fit glass into. to glaze a window.
2. to cover with glass or a glaze. The potter glazed the vase.
3. (of eyes) to become blank or dull.
noun
1. a glassy coating put on pottery etc. a pink glaze on the grey vase.
2. a shiny coating eg of sugar on fruit etc.
ˈglazier (-ziə) , ((American) -ʒər) noun
a person who puts glass in window frames etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
In judging of that tempestuous wind called Euroclydon, says an old writer --of whose works I possess the only copy extant -- it maketh a marvellous difference, whether thou lookest out at it from a glass window where the frost is all on the outside, or whether thou observest it from that sashless window, where the frost is on both sides, and of which the wight Death is the only glazier. True enough, thought I, as this passage occurred to my mind --old black-letter, thou reasonest well.
The house itself is in tolerably good condition, though badly weather-stained and in dire need of attention from the glazier, the smaller male population of the region having attested in the manner of its kind its disapproval of dwelling without dwellers.
Crabbe, the glazier, who gathered much news and groped among it dimly.
"But he won't keep his money, by what I can make out," said the glazier. "Don't they say as there's somebody can strip it off him?
"If they come to lawing, and it's all true as folks say, there's more to be looked to nor money," said the glazier. "There's this poor creetur as is dead and gone; by what I can make out, he'd seen the day when he was a deal finer gentleman nor Bulstrode."
Coming to the top, it gave him a passing chill of surprise (there being no rooms but his up there) to find a stranger sitting on the window-sill, more after the manner of a venturesome glazier than an amateur ordinarily careful of his neck; in fact, so much more outside the window than inside, as to suggest the thought that he must have come up by the water- spout instead of the stairs.
Price to the attendant, who in dress and general appearance looked something between a bankrupt glazier, and a drover in a state of insolvency; 'and a glass of brandy-and-water, Crookey, d'ye hear?
Not the blacksmith who opened the lock; nor the glazier who mended the pane; nor the jobber who let the carriage; nor the groom who drove it; nor the butcher who provided the leg of mutton; nor the coals which roasted it; nor the cook who basted it; nor the servants who ate it: and this I am given to understand is not unfrequently the way in which people live elegantly on nothing a year.
To a glazier, for the windows of the said chamber, forty-six sols, eight deniers parisis."
"Build a house round her," they cried, and at once everybody perceived that this was the thing to do; in a moment a hundred fairy sawyers were among the branches, architects were running round Maimie, measuring her; a bricklayer's yard sprang up at her feet, seventy-five masons rushed up with the foundation stone and the Queen laid it, overseers were appointed to keep the boys off, scaffoldings were run up, the whole place rang with hammers and chisels and turning lathes, and by this time the roof was on and the glaziers were putting in the windows.
They were masons, carpenters, joiners, slaters, blacksmiths, and glaziers; and there was work enough to last them for a long time, for had they not their own houses to build when they had finished those for other people?
Gordon had some memorable matches against the Sky Blues and also played at Highfield Road in Bill Glazier's testimonial game, two years after his tragic car accident in 1972.