glen


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glen

 (glĕn)
n.
A small, secluded valley.

[Middle English, from Scottish Gaelic gleann, from Old Irish glenn.]

glen

(ɡlɛn)
n
(Physical Geography) a narrow and deep mountain valley, esp in Scotland or Ireland
[C15: from Scottish Gaelic gleann, from Old Irish glend]
ˈglenˌlike adj

glen

(glɛn)

n.
a small, narrow, secluded valley.
[1480–90; < Irish, Scottish Gaelic gleann; c. Welsh glynn]
glen′like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glen - a narrow secluded valley (in the mountains)glen - a narrow secluded valley (in the mountains)
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
vale, valley - a long depression in the surface of the land that usually contains a river
Translations

glen

[glen] Ncañada f

glen

[ˈglɛn] nvallée f

glen

nTal nt

glen

[glɛn] nvallone m
References in classic literature ?
Little James never forgot these things, and long afterwards, when he grew to be a man and wrote poetry, it was full of the sounds of battle, full, too, of love for mountain and glen and their rolling mists.
His father and mother were poor farmer people, and James ran about barefooted and wild among the hills and glens.
When two trappers undertake any considerable stream, their mode of proceeding is, to hide their horses in some lonely glen, where they can graze unobserved.
Their trail has been discovered, perhaps, and followed up for many a mile; or their smoke has been seen curling up out of the secret glen, or has been scented by the savages, whose sense of smell is almost as acute as that of sight.
So it came about that one day they slipped from the kraal when the gates were open, and sought out a certain deep glen which had an evil name, for it was said that spirits haunted it and put those to death who entered there.
This is a little white house on the harbor shore, half way between Glen St.
For being at Tranque, years ago, when attached to the trading-ship Dey of Algiers, I was invited to spend part of the Arsacidean holidays with the lord of Tranque, at his retired palm villa at Pupella; a sea-side glen not very far distant from what our sailors called Bamboo-Town, his capital.
STATE OF AFFAIRS ABOARD THE SHIP--CONTENTS OF HER LARDER--LENGTH OF SOUTH SEAMEN'S VOYAGES--ACCOUNT OF A FLYING WHALE-MAN--DETERMINATION TO LEAVE THE VESSEL--THE BAY OF NUKUHEVA--THE TYPEES--INVASION OF THEIR VALLEY BY PORTER -- REFLECTIONS -- GLEN OF TIOR--INTERVIEW BETWEEN THE OLD KING AND THE FRENCH ADMIRAL
You cross a divide from it and come out at Glen Ellen.
No one ever came there, not even the village boys of Glen Ellen.
Yet, to himself, he made the excuse of going to Glen Ellen for the purpose of inspecting the brickyard with which Holdsworthy had goldbricked him.
This was to lie the night in Kinlochaline in the public inn; to cross Morven the next day to Ardgour, and lie the night in the house of one John of the Claymore, who was warned that I might come; the third day, to be set across one loch at Corran and another at Balachulish, and then ask my way to the house of James of the Glens, at Aucharn in Duror of Appin.