glioblastoma

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Related to glioblastomas: meningiomas, gliomas

gli·o·blas·to·ma

 (glē′ō-blă-stō′mə, glī′-)
n. pl. gli·o·blas·to·mas or gli·o·blas·to·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A malignant tumor of the central nervous system, usually occurring in the cerebrum of adults.

glioblastoma

(ˌɡlaɪəʊblæsˈtəʊmə; ˌɡliːəʊ-)
adj
(Pathology) med a malignant tumour of the central nervous system
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glioblastoma - a fast-growing malignant brain tumor composed of spongioblasts; nearly always fatal
brain tumor, brain tumour - a tumor in the brain
Translations
glioblastoma

glioblastoma

n. glioblastoma, tipo de tumor cerebral.

glioblastoma

n glioblastoma m; glioblastoma multiforme glioblastoma multiforme
References in periodicals archive ?
Is the prognostic significance of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation equally important in glioblastomas of patients from different continents?
can be problematic in distinguishing metastatic carcinoma from glial neoplasms, especially since epithelial and pseudoepithelial differentiation, along with expression of various cytokeratins, have been well established in glioblastomas [6].
City of Hope is treating patients with CAR-T cells targeting the IL13Ra2 antigen, a protein that is found on the cell surface of a majority of glioblastomas.
Zhu and his colleagues tested whether the virus could kill stem cells in glioblastomas removed from patients at diagnosis.
While there are many different types of brain cancer, glioblastomas are the most common in adults, and are one of the hardest to treat, BBC News noted.
Glioblastomas typically arise from genetic changes to cells inside the brain.
Extraneural metastases of astrocytomas and glioblastomas: clinicopathological study of two cases and review of the literature.
[P.sub.4] promotes the growth, migration, and invasion of human astrocytoma cells lines such as U373 (grade III), U87, and D54 (both grade IV or glioblastomas) [4-6].
Glioblastomas occur most commonly in the frontal and temporal (side) lobes of the brain, where they produce disturbing symptoms that include persistent headaches, double or blurred vision, vomiting, changes in mood and personality, changes in cognition, seizures, and speech difficulty.
Wen, "Current status of antiangiogenic therapies for glioblastomas," Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, vol.
According to the researchers the protein, found in most glioblastomas, can be targeted to develop a drug treatment for these highly malignant brain tumors.
Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of intracranial tumours, highly resistant to combined treatment, in patients displaying a median survival time of 15 months [1].