globalization

(redirected from globalisers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to globalisers: globalizers

glob·al·ize

 (glō′bə-līz′)
tr.v. glob·al·ized, glob·al·iz·ing, glob·al·iz·es
To make global or worldwide in scope or application.

glob′al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
glob′al·iz′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

globalization

(ˌɡləʊbəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

globalisation

n
1. (Banking & Finance) the process enabling financial and investment markets to operate internationally, largely as a result of deregulation and improved communications
2. (Commerce) the emergence since the 1980s of a single world market dominated by multinational companies, leading to a diminishing capacity for national governments to control their economies
3. (Commerce) the process by which a company, etc, expands to operate internationally
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.globalization - growth to a global or worldwide scaleglobalization - growth to a global or worldwide scale; "the globalization of the communication industry"
economic process - any process affecting the production and development and management of material wealth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
globalizace
globalisering
globalisaatio
globalizacija
globalizáció
グローバル化
세계화
globalisering
โลกาภิวัฒน์
toàn cầu hóa

globalization

[ˌgləʊbəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] Nglobalización f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

globalization

[ˌgləʊbəlaɪˈzeɪʃən] globalisation (British) n [industry] → mondialisation f
economic globalization → la mondialisation économique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

globalization

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

globalization

عَوْلَـمَة globalizace globalisering Globalisierung παγκοσμιοποίηση globalización globalisaatio mondialisation globalizacija globalizzazione グローバル化 세계화 globalisatie globalisering globalizacja globalização глобализация globalisering โลกาภิวัฒน์ küreselleşme toàn cầu hóa 全球化
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Pakistan liberalized its economy as a part of adjustment but Pakistan's trade expansion has not been as spectacular as some of the fast globalisers. Pakistan's exports, merchandize exports, have not kept pace with that of the rest of the world.
Equally inadequate and irrelevant is the preoccupation - almost an obsession for the Brexit-Britain right - with the role of empire in an integrating "island story" of plucky white British patriots and globalisers. Even at the height of the Victorian empire, some figures who are now held up by empire nostalgics as inviolable national icons, most notably Cecil Rhodes, were criticised by their compatriots as acting more in their own than in the national interest.
(29) In other words, globalisation has turned against the globalisers, playing to the advantage of countries which have demonstrated the ability to absorb modern technologies and maintain competitive labour costs and which are in the possession of resources essential for sustaining high economic growth rate.
Attempts at regional cooperation are confronted by the fact that, as one of the book's contributors, Thandika Mkandawire, observes, African countries are globalisers, and not regionalisers.
(6) What credibility the globalisation thesis did have was based on two rather perverse phenomena: firstly, the export-oriented growth that the globalisers advocated only seemed to work as long as the US economy could suck in imports from all over the world (not to mention fight wars and invest abroad); and secondly, the capital mobility that they advocated worked not - as was claimed - to channel capital to its most productive purposes, but to enable the US to pay for its imports with the capital that its financial system hoovered up from all over the world and poured into the US economy.
(12) Sklair's findings, depicting Hawke and Keating as key globalisers, give further weight to the arguments that Labor pioneered both globalisation and neoliberalism.