glory-of-the-snow


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Related to glory-of-the-snow: snowdrop

glo·ry-of-the-snow

(glôr′ē-əv-thə-snō′)
n.
A small bulbous plant (Chionodoxa forbesii) native to southwest Asia, Crete, and Cyprus, cultivated for its early-blooming blue flowers. Also called chionodoxa.

glory-of-the-snow

n
(Plants) a small W Asian liliaceous plant, Chionodoxa luciliae, cultivated for its early-blooming blue flowers
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References in periodicals archive ?
They include winter aconite and glory-of-the-snow as well as snowdrops.
Chionodoxa (Glory-of-the-snow), Eranthis (Winter aconite) and Crocus chrysanthus (Snow crocus) will herald the coming season and serve to move us together into a glorious spring season.
Expert tip: Put it in the spotlight with ground-hugging evergreens of a pool of spring-flowering bulbs such as Glory-of-the-Snow or Chionodoxa.
Some of my favorites are blue and white glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa) and yellow winter aconites (Eranthis).
Over in the formal terrace beds, Glory-of-the-snow with its deep blue flowers stands proud, complementing the blue striped petals of its neighbouring Stripped Squill.
Grape hyacinth, regular hyacinth, wood hyacinth (Hyacinthoides hispanica), all the ornamental onions, dogtooth violets, dwarf iris, snowdrops, winter aconite, chionodoxa (Glory-of-the-Snow), scillas by the hundreds, guinea hen flowers (Fritillaria meleagris), and of course daffodils in all of their vast array.
They are followed by other fall-planted spring bulbs: species tulips, glory-of-the-snow, scilla and grape hyacinth.
Yet, it is too soon to look for the first snowdrops, winter aconites, crocus, scillas, glory-of-the-snow or bulbous iris unless you have a special microclimate near the house or unless you pay a visit to a well-stocked florist shop.
Daffodils, grape hyacinths, all of the flowering onions (Alliums), dogtooth violets (Erythronium), glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa), winter aconites (Eranthis), snowdrops Galanthus), scillas (Scilla), Grecian windflowers (Anemone), Guinea Hen flowers (Fritillaria), and wood hyacinths (Hyacinthoides) are seldom eaten by pests.
They include winter aconite, snowdrops and glory-of-the-snow.
Glory-of-the-Snow (Chionodoxa) in April will have clusters of blue, pink, or white flowers about five to six inches above the ground-covering mulch.