glossitis


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Related to glossitis: Geographic tongue, atrophic glossitis

glos·si·tis

 (glô-sī′tĭs, glŏ-)
n.
Inflammation of the tongue.

glos·sit′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glossitis

(ɡlɒˈsaɪtɪs)
n
(Pathology) inflammation of the tongue
glossitic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glos•si•tis

(glɒˈsaɪ tɪs, glɔ-)

n.
inflammation of the tongue.
[1815–25]
glos•sit′ic (-ˈsɪt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

glossitis

an inflamed condition of the tongue. — glossitic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glossitis - inflammation of the tongue
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
acute glossitis - glossitis resulting from injury or infection and characterized by swelling and pain
chronic glossitis - glossitis with atrophy of tongue tissue; sometimes accompanies pernicious anemia
glossodynia exfoliativa, Moeller's glossitis - a superficial form of glossitis marked by irregular red patches on the tongue and sensitivity to hot or spicy food
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

glos·si·tis

, glottitis
n. glositis, glotitis infl. de la lengua;
acute ______ aguda, asociada con estomatitis.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

glossitis

n glositis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In humans, glossitis is the inflammation of which part of the body?
The patient had a history of episodic fevers as a child with non-pruritic erythematous macular rashes, conjunctivitis, glossitis, night sweats, and arthralgias.
Other lesions found included moderate multifocal chronic lymphoplasmacytic interstitial nephritis, diffuse hepatic mild lipidosis, erosive glossitis and focal orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis.
glossitis, macroglossia, aglossia) and its associated anatomical structures (e.g.
(6) On physical examination, look for signs of protein-calorie malnutrition, including cheilitis, glossitis, and bleeding gums; signs of alcohol abuse, such as hepatomegaly; and evidence of injuries or poor self-care.
cases Weakness 7 Muscle pain 7 Fever 6 Fatigue 6 Peripheral edema 6 Weight loss 5 Dysphagia 4 Glossitis 4 Diarrhea 4 Delirium 3 Congestive cardiac failure 1 * In 2 cases the clinical features were only sourced from published reports (1,5) rather than patient records (2-4).
This subtype sometimes develops as part of a group of symptoms, which can include atrophic glossitis, esophageal webs or strictures, and microcytic hypochromic anemia (Plummer-Vinson syndrome) (11).
Among other things, in the group of non-specific lesions there are aphthous ulcers, angular cheilitis, pyostomatitis vegetans, persistent submandibular lymphadenopathy, lichenoid reactions, EM, SJS, glossitis, depapillation of the tongue, halitosis, dental erosion and caries, periodontal disease, spontaneous bleeding, opportunistic infections, mucosal atrophy, perioral erythema, pale mucosa, gingival hyperplasia, stomatitis, erosions, and ulcerations, whereas symptoms sometimes described include odynophagia, dysphagia, tongue pain, taste disturbances, and a burning sensation (37, 38).
However, it is widely recognized that, among these atypical signs of CD, there are certain oral manifestations which are surely interwoven to CD: tooth enamel lesions and defects, frequent aphthous stomatitis, delayed tooth eruption, multiple caries, angular cheilitis, atrophic glossitis, dry mouth, and burning tongue.
Forty-six months after the diagnostic, the first malignancy the patient developed symptomatic lesions in base of tongue was diagnosed as nonspecific chronic glossitis. The tissue adjacent to the lesion was evaluated with immunohistochemical staining for p53 (Figure 1) with some focal areas in the basal and suprabasal layer with weak nuclear staining and Ki-67 (Figure 2) with the positivity of basal and suprabasal layer.
The lesion is characterized by nonpainful tongue mass, an ulcer, a fissure, tuberculoma, diffuse glossitis, and nonhealing tongue lesion [23, 27, 29].
In an earlier study, Rhodus and Johnson showed a high prevalence of oral lesions among SLE patients, including angular cheilitis, ulcers, mucositis, and glossitis. A high prevalence of oral complaints such as dysphagia, dysgeusia, and glossodynia was also present [15].