glottochronology


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glottochronology

(ˌɡlɒtəʊkrəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Linguistics) the use of lexicostatistics to establish that languages are historically related
[C20 glotto-, from Greek glōtta tongue]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glottochronology

a statistical and lexical study of two languages deriving from a common source to determine the time of their divergence, as English and German. Cf. lexicostatistics. — glottochronologist, n. — glottochronological, adj.
See also: Linguistics
the study of two or more related but distinct languages in order to determine when they separated, by examining the lexicon they share and those parts of it that have been replaced. — glottochronologist, n.glottochronological, adj.
See also: Time
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

glottochronology

The study of the historical relationships between languages.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glottochronology - the determination of how long ago different languages evolved from a common source language; "he mapped the glottochronology of the Romance languages"
chronology - the determination of the actual temporal sequence of past events
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The last decades have witnessed a renewal of interest in lexicostatistics and glottochronology. Different scholars use different mathematic algorithms: some work with the classical Swadesh method or its modified versions (Hofirkova, Blazek 2012), some use methods borrowed from evolutionary biology, such as maximum parsimony or Bayesian phylogenetic inference (Chang, Cathcart, Hall, Garrett 2015; Honkola 2016).
More recent linguistic data have put into doubt these perspectives: the timing of the Mixe-Zoquean linguistic borrowing has now been placed in the Late Preclassic, and not around 1000 BC [1, 76], while the assumption behind glottochronology (that languages change at a steady rate) is now untenable [1, 77].
Glottochronology and the chronology of maize in the Americas.