glutamine


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Related to glutamine: creatine, BCAA

glu·ta·mine

 (glo͞o′tə-mēn′)
n.
A nonessential amino acid, C5H10N2O3, occurring widely in plant and animal tissue and proteins and produced commercially for use in medicine and biochemical research.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glutamine

(ˈɡluːtəˌmiːn; -mɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins: plays an important role in protein metabolism
[C19: from glut(en) + -amine]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glu•ta•mine

(ˈglu təˌmin, -mɪn)

n.
a crystalline amino acid, C5H10N2O3, related to glutamic acid and found in many plant and animal proteins. Abbr.: Gln; Symbol: Q
[1880–85; glut(en) + amine]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

glu·ta·mine

(glo͞o′tə-mēn′)
A nonessential amino acid. See more at amino acid.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glutamine - a crystalline amino acid occurring in proteins; important in protein metabolism
amino acid, aminoalkanoic acid - organic compounds containing an amino group and a carboxylic acid group; "proteins are composed of various proportions of about 20 common amino acids"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
glutamine
glutamina

glutamine

n glutamina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was known that these carriers act like a lift, wherein the glutamine substrate is swallowed by the protein and then carried over a long distance through the cell membrane, from the outside to the inside of the cell.
The effects of oral glutamine supplementation on athletes, exhaustive exercise.
Nascimento et al [25] indicated that increasing the glutamine consumption (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 g/kg) linearly reduced the coccidiosis incidence from days 1 to 21 of age.
The aim of our study is to determine the role of perioperative glutamine, arginine and HMB-rich diet on anastomosichealing after elective colonic anastomosis in rats.
Whether supplied by condiments, food sources, glutamine supplements, or made in the body, glutamate plays a key role in many essential neural, motor and metabolic processes.
Roberta Gottlieb, co-author of the study said, "While glutamine is known to spur cancer growth, its role in prostate cancer cells to trigger reprogramming of adenocarcinoma cells into neuroendocrine cancer cells is a new and important finding."
Investigations have indicated that some amino acids, including glutamine, arginine, ornithine, citrulline, tryptophan, valine, and leucine, could be efficient nitrogen source for dermatophytes.8-10 Some amino acids have also antifungal effects on dermatophytes.
Glutamine is a conditional essential amino acid and plays an important role in energy source for cell proliferation.[5] Recent studies showed that glutamine possessed immunomodulatory function, which could attenuate the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a), interleukin-1[sz] (IL-1[sz]), IL-6, and IL-8 caused by oxidative stress and prevent lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).[6],[7],[8] Glutamine could ameliorate a loss of epithelial barrier function and epithelial proliferation caused by total parenteral nutrition by upregulating E-cadherin and [sz]-catenin expression.[9] Pretreatment of glutamine could be useful for VILI, but the exact mechanism remains unknown.
The explants were inoculated in culture flasks (30mm x 150mm, one explant per flask) containing 30mL of MS medium (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) solidified with 0.7% of agar and supplemented with sucrose (3%), BAP (6-Benzilaminopurine, 0.5 mg [L.sup.-1]) and different salt concentrations as follows: MS medium with original concentrations of nitrogen salts (20mM N[H.sub.4]N[O.sub.3] and 18.8mM KN[O.sub.3]), MS medium with 10mM N[H.sub.4]N[O.sub.3] and 9.4mM KN[O.sub.3] known as 1/2 strength (MS1/2) and MS medium free of N[H.sub.4]N[O.sub.3] and KN[O.sub.3] containing glutamine in final concentrations of 5, 10, 30 and 60mM.
* Glutamine, which is a key amino acid in a number of metabolic functions.
Lens cells in eye, accomplished intracellular communication via an immense network of gap junctions formed by the structural proteins belongs to connexin family, to permit the trafficking of ions and small solutes of size C (pE368Q) (GenBank KY556641) point mutation that substitutes glutamic acid, at position 368 with glutamine in patient sample A14 (Fig.
Milner also pointed out that glutamine deficiency could be an indirect consequence of the disease.

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