gluttony


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glut·ton·y

 (glŭt′n-ē)
n. pl. glut·ton·ies
Excess in eating or drinking.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gluttony

(ˈɡlʌtənɪ) or

gluttonousness

n
the act or practice of eating to excess
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glut•ton•y

(ˈglʌt n i)

n.
excessive eating and drinking.
[1175–1225]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gluttony - habitual eating to excessgluttony - habitual eating to excess    
intemperance - the quality of being intemperate
greediness, hoggishness, piggishness - an excessive desire for food
2.gluttony - eating to excess (personified as one of the deadly sins)gluttony - eating to excess (personified as one of the deadly sins)
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

gluttony

noun greed, rapacity, voracity, greediness, voraciousness, piggishness Gluttony is a deadly sin.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
شَرَه، نَهَم
nenasytnostobžerstvížravost
grådighedgrovæderi
glutemeco
mässäilyylensyönti
torkosság
græîgi
暴食
oburluk

gluttony

[ˈglʌtənɪ] Nglotonería f, gula f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gluttony

[ˈglʌtəni] n
(= greed) → gloutonnerie f
(= sin) → gourmandise f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

gluttony

nVöllerei f, → Fresserei f (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gluttony

[ˈglʌtənɪ] nghiottoneria, golosità; (sin) → gola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

glutton

(ˈglatən) noun
1. a person who eats too much. That child is fat because he is such a glutton.
2. a person who is always eager for more of something usually unpleasant. He's a glutton for work.
ˈgluttony noun
greediness in eating.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
While indulging themselves in the pleasures of the table, they aimed at delicacy, but avoided excess, and were apt to attribute gluttony and drunkenness to the vanquished Saxons, as vices peculiar to their inferior station.
To show you how fortuitous was development in those days let me state that had it not been for the gluttony of Lop-Ear I might have brought about the domestication of the dog.
If, regardless of that counsel, you choose to make a beast of yourself now, and over-eat and over-drink yourself till you turn the good victuals into poison, who is to blame if, hereafter, while you are suffering the torments of yesterday's gluttony and drunkenness, you see more temperate men sitting down to enjoy themselves at that splendid entertainment which you are unable to taste?'
We have to slay pride in giants, envy by generosity and nobleness of heart, anger by calmness of demeanour and equanimity, gluttony and sloth by the spareness of our diet and the length of our vigils, lust and lewdness by the loyalty we preserve to those whom we have made the mistresses of our thoughts, indolence by traversing the world in all directions seeking opportunities of making ourselves, besides Christians, famous knights.
Had the cub thought in man-fashion, he might have epitomised life as a voracious appetite and the world as a place wherein ranged a multitude of appetites, pursuing and being pursued, hunting and being hunted, eating and being eaten, all in blindness and confusion, with violence and disorder, a chaos of gluttony and slaughter, ruled over by chance, merciless, planless, endless.
The gluttony of Swine is put before us, as an example to the young." (I thought this pretty well in him who had been praising up the pork for being so plump and juicy.) "What is detestable in a pig, is more detestable in a boy."
"Good!" said the Duc de Beaufort to himself, "every man in order that he may lose his heart and soul, must receive from celestial bounty one of the seven capital sins, perhaps two; it seems that Master La Ramee's is gluttony. Let us then take advantage of it." Then, aloud:
At last he reached the fast disappearing feast and with his sharp knife slashed off a more generous portion than he had hoped for, an entire hairy forearm, where it protruded from beneath the feet of the mighty Kerchak, who was so busily engaged in perpetuating the royal prerogative of gluttony that he failed to note the act of LESE-MAJESTE.
Juvenal similarly speaks of `cruda senectus' (caused by gluttony).
In knowledge of horseflesh he was almost equal to a farrier, in stable learning he surpassed his own head groom, and in gluttony not a pig on his estate was a match for him.
A religious celebration usually signalized by gluttony and drunkenness, frequently in honor of some holy person distinguished for abstemiousness.
Yet here are we in the lists of life, and there come the seven black champions against us Sir Pride, Sir Covetousness, Sir Lust, Sir Anger, Sir Gluttony, Sir Envy, and Sir Sloth.