glycogen


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gly·co·gen

 (glī′kə-jən)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is the main form of carbohydrate storage in animals and is found primarily in the liver and muscle tissue. It is readily converted to glucose as needed by the body to satisfy its energy needs. Also called animal starch.

gly′co·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

glycogen

(ˈɡlaɪkəʊdʒən; -dʒɛn)
n
(Biochemistry) a polysaccharide consisting of glucose units: the form in which carbohydrate is stored in the liver and muscles in man and animals. It can easily be hydrolysed to glucose. Also called: animal starch
glycogenic adj

gly•co•gen

(ˈglaɪ kə dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
a polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, composed of glucose isomers, that is the principal carbohydrate stored by the animal body and is readily converted to glucose when needed for energy use.
[1855–60]

gly·co·gen

(glī′kə-jən)
A carbohydrate stored in the liver and muscles of animals that is converted to glucose for energy when glucose levels in the blood are depleted.

glycogen

A carbohydrate stored in the liver. It is produced from, but more complex than, glucose. See monosaccharides, polysaccharides.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glycogen - one form in which body fuel is stored; stored primarily in the liver and broken down into glucose when needed by the body
polyose, polysaccharide - any of a class of carbohydrates whose molecules contain chains of monosaccharide molecules
Translations
Glykogen
glycogeen

glycogen

[ˈglaɪkəʊdʒen] Nglicógeno m

glycogen

[ˈglaɪkəʊdʒən] nglicogeno

gly·co·gen

n. glucógeno, polisacárido usualmente almacenado en el hígado que se convierte en glucosa según lo necesite el organismo;
___ storage diseasehepatina, almacenamiento de glucógeno en el hígado.
References in periodicals archive ?
When your dog is working hard during training, hunting, or competition, one of the fuels it uses is called glycogen, which is made up of glucose.
Due to the limitation of oxygen availability, energy metabolism switches from lipid metabolism to glycogen metabolism in embryos [2,3].
The glycogen content after the first week of maintenance ofL.
No notable difference was also seen on glycogen replenishment.
Most hangovers leave us reaching for fatty carbs, Gabriela explains: "The metabolism of alcohol can alter blood sugar balance by depleting your storage of glycogen, or carbohydrates.
Different concentrations (2, 5, 10, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 mg/L) of GA3 were added to the synthetic diet and protein, lipid, carbohydrate and glycogen levels in the hemolymph were evaluated for the GA3 concentrations.
Preclinical studies evaluating activity of the secretable, modified GAA enzyme found in SPK-3006 in acid alpha-glucosidase knockout mice showed decreased glycogen accumulation, increased survival and improved cardiac, respiratory and muscle function.
Cardiac rhabdomyoma is characterized by large glycogen containing vacuolated cells and is also referred to as rhabdomyomatosis, congenital glycogen tumor, circumscribed glycogen storage disease, nodular glycogen degeneration, nodular glycogen, and nodular glycogen infiltration (KIZAWA et al., 2002).
Post exercise or rest, the researchers tested the blood glucose levels and muscle glycogen levels of the 12 healthy male volunteers who took part.
This stain is used primarily to detect the amount of glycogen in the cytoplasm.
Endogenous CHO availability is commonly manipulated as follows: 1) by an 8-12 h fasting period before training, reducing liver but not muscle glycogen (7); 2) by reducing CHO diet content for a few days, reducing mainly liver glycogen (8); 3) by performing a pre-exercise before the main exercise to reduce pre-exercise liver and muscle glycogen (9); 4) or by a combination of two or more of those approaches (6,9).
Also, when you work out consistently your glycogen store breaks down.