glycol

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gly·col

 (glī′kôl′, -kōl′, -kŏl′)
n.
1. Any of various diols, usually containing vicinal hydroxyl groups.
2. Ethylene glycol.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glycol

(ˈɡlaɪkɒl)
n
(Chemistry) another name (not in technical usage) for ethanediol, diol
glycolic, glycollic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gly•col

(ˈglaɪ kɔl, -kɒl)

n.
1. a colorless, sweet liquid, C2H6O2, used chiefly as an automobile antifreeze and as a solvent.
2. any of a group of alcohols containing two hydroxyl groups.
[1855–60; glyc (erin) + (alcoh) ol]
gly•col′ic (-ˈkɒl ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glycol - a sweet but poisonous syrupy liquid used as an antifreeze and solvent
antifreeze - a liquid added to the water in a cooling system to lower its freezing point
2.glycol - any of a class of alcohols having 2 hydroxyl groups in each molecule
alcohol - any of a series of volatile hydroxyl compounds that are made from hydrocarbons by distillation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
glikol
glykol

glycol

[ˈglaɪkɒl] Nglicol m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glycol

nGlykol nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

glycol

[ˈglaɪkɒl] nglicol m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Biologically degradable polymers that are already in clinical use are usually based on polyesters such as poly([alpha]-caprolactone) or poly([alpha]-hydroxy acids), e.g., copolymers of lactic and glycollic acid.
Glycollic acid, glycerin and tea tree clean impurities, revitalise skin and banish all the dirt, dead skin and debris.