glyptics


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glyp·tics

 (glĭp′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The art of engraving or carving, especially on precious stones; glyptography.

glyptics

(ˈɡlɪptɪks)
n
(Art Terms) (functioning as singular) the art of engraving precious stones
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glyptics - the art of engraving on precious stones
glyptic art, glyptography - carvings or engravings (especially on precious stones)
References in periodicals archive ?
Cylinder Seals of Eleven Eunuchs (sa resi Officials): A Study of Glyptics Dated to the Reign of Adad-nerari III.
A total of 1522 Neo-Assyrian and early Late Babylonian ("spatbabylonische"--often termed "Neo-Babylonian" by English-speaking art historians) period glyptic objects were recovered in Lower Town II.
Vandenabeele, "Evaluation of portable Raman spectroscopy and handheld X-ray fluorescence analysis (hXRF) for the direct analysis of glyptics," Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, vol.
It included an agate cameo of Elizabeth I, a gold watch set in a massive emerald from the Muzzo mines of Colombia, sapphires, diamonds and rubies from the India, as well as glyptics of classical and Byzantine antiquity already 16 centuries old when the hoard was buried, in the early 17th century.
469) attended by his recurrent theme of "hybridisation" in pottery, carved ivory, glyptics, faience, iconography, and mortuary practices.
Neglected for years, the study of English glyptics has recently taken on a new lease of life.
Wimmer); specialists' studies of stamp seals, glyptics, weaving implements, ground and chipped stone objects, and notched scapulae (O.
In the post-classical section, the two specialities of English glyptics, the portrait and insignia, are well represented.
(10) In fact, outspread wings as the support for a profile male bust is a characteristic and not uncommon device in Sasanian glyptics. (11) Double wings appear on seals of officials and priests but also on those of people without apparent official position, judging by the accompanying inscriptions, although many of these seals--certainly those of common people--are uninscribed; wings may even support an animal's head, such as a ram's or a stag's.
The section on the EBA Syrian glyptics extensively deals with a topic previously poorly investigated and should therefore have called for a separate volume.
Glyptics, for instance, is not always understood, as exemplified by figure h showing a seal impression with the priest-king and Inanna placed back-to-back, whereas the prelate is meant to approach the goddess face-to-face, presenting her with a stalk of grain.