gnaw

(redirected from gnawingly)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

gnaw

 (nô)
v. gnawed, gnaw·ing, gnaws
v.tr.
1.
a. To bite, chew on, or erode with the teeth.
b. To produce by gnawing: gnaw a hole.
c. To erode or diminish gradually as if by gnawing: waves gnawing the rocky shore.
2. To afflict or worry persistently: fear that constantly gnawed me.
v.intr.
1. To bite or chew persistently: The dog gnawed at the bone.
2. To cause erosion or gradual diminishment.
3. To cause persistent worry or pain: Hunger gnawed at the prisoners.

[Middle English gnauen, from Old English gnagan.]

gnaw′er n.

gnaw

(nɔː)
vb, gnaws, gnawing, gnawed, gnawed or gnawn (nɔːn)
1. (when: intr, often foll by at or upon) to bite (at) or chew (upon) constantly so as to wear away little by little
2. (tr) to form by gnawing: to gnaw a hole.
3. to cause erosion of (something)
4. (when: intr, often foll by at) to cause constant distress or anxiety (to)
n
the act or an instance of gnawing
[Old English gnagan; related to Old Norse gnaga, Old High German gnagan]
ˈgnawable adj
ˈgnawer n
ˈgnawing adj, n
ˈgnawingly adv

gnaw

(nɔ)

v.t.
1. to bite or chew on, esp. persistently: The kitten gnawed the slippers.
2. to wear away or remove by persistent biting.
3. to form by gnawing: to gnaw a hole.
4. to waste or wear away.
5. to trouble or torment by constant annoyance; vex; plague.
v.i.
6. to bite or chew persistently.
7. to cause corrosion.
8. to cause an effect resembling corrosion: Her mistake gnawed at her conscience.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English gnagen, c. Old Saxon gnagan, Old High German (g)nagan, Old Norse gnaga]
gnaw′a•ble, adj.
gnaw′er, n.

gnaw


Past participle: gnawed/gnawn
Gerund: gnawing

Imperative
gnaw
gnaw
Present
I gnaw
you gnaw
he/she/it gnaws
we gnaw
you gnaw
they gnaw
Preterite
I gnawed
you gnawed
he/she/it gnawed
we gnawed
you gnawed
they gnawed
Present Continuous
I am gnawing
you are gnawing
he/she/it is gnawing
we are gnawing
you are gnawing
they are gnawing
Present Perfect
I have gnawed/gnawn
you have gnawed/gnawn
he/she/it has gnawed/gnawn
we have gnawed/gnawn
you have gnawed/gnawn
they have gnawed/gnawn
Past Continuous
I was gnawing
you were gnawing
he/she/it was gnawing
we were gnawing
you were gnawing
they were gnawing
Past Perfect
I had gnawed/gnawn
you had gnawed/gnawn
he/she/it had gnawed/gnawn
we had gnawed/gnawn
you had gnawed/gnawn
they had gnawed/gnawn
Future
I will gnaw
you will gnaw
he/she/it will gnaw
we will gnaw
you will gnaw
they will gnaw
Future Perfect
I will have gnawed/gnawn
you will have gnawed/gnawn
he/she/it will have gnawed/gnawn
we will have gnawed/gnawn
you will have gnawed/gnawn
they will have gnawed/gnawn
Future Continuous
I will be gnawing
you will be gnawing
he/she/it will be gnawing
we will be gnawing
you will be gnawing
they will be gnawing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gnawing
you have been gnawing
he/she/it has been gnawing
we have been gnawing
you have been gnawing
they have been gnawing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gnawing
you will have been gnawing
he/she/it will have been gnawing
we will have been gnawing
you will have been gnawing
they will have been gnawing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gnawing
you had been gnawing
he/she/it had been gnawing
we had been gnawing
you had been gnawing
they had been gnawing
Conditional
I would gnaw
you would gnaw
he/she/it would gnaw
we would gnaw
you would gnaw
they would gnaw
Past Conditional
I would have gnawed/gnawn
you would have gnawed/gnawn
he/she/it would have gnawed/gnawn
we would have gnawed/gnawn
you would have gnawed/gnawn
they would have gnawed/gnawn
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.gnaw - bite or chew on with the teeth; "gnaw an old cracker"
chew, manducate, masticate, jaw - chew (food); to bite and grind with the teeth; "He jawed his bubble gum"; "Chew your food and don't swallow it!"; "The cows were masticating the grass"
bite, seize with teeth - to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws; "Gunny invariably tried to bite her"
2.gnaw - become ground down or deteriorate; "Her confidence eroded"
decay, dilapidate, crumble - fall into decay or ruin; "The unoccupied house started to decay"

gnaw

verb
1. bite, chew, nibble, munch Woodlice attack living plants and gnaw at the stems.
2. distress, worry, trouble, harry, haunt, plague, nag, fret Doubts were already gnawing away at the back of his mind.
3. erode, consume, devour, eat away or into, wear away or down This run of bad luck has gnawed away at his usually optimistic character.

gnaw

verb
1. To seize, as food, with the teeth:
2. To consume gradually, as by chemical reaction or friction:
Translations
يَقرِض، يَقضِم بِصَوت عالي
hryzatokousávat
gnave
jäytääjyrsiäkalvaa
glodati
rágrágcsál
naga
graužiantis
grauzt
hrýzť
glodatipreglodati se
kemirmek

gnaw

[nɔː]
A. VT (= chew, also fig) → roer, carcomer
gnawed by doubts/hungeratormentado por las dudas/el hambre
B. VIroer
to gnaw throughroer or carcomer haciendo un agujero en
to gnaw at (lit, fig) → roer
gnaw off VT + ADVroer

gnaw

[ˈnɔː] vt
(= chew) → ronger
to gnaw at sb [guilt, doubt] → ronger qn
gnaw away
vi [fear, feeling] → ronger
to gnaw away at sb → ronger qn

gnaw

vtnagen an (+dat); fingernails alsokauen an (+dat); (rust, disease)fressen an (+dat); holenagen; (fig) person (hunger, anxiety)quälen; (remorse)verzehren; to gnaw something offetw abnagen; the box had been gnawed by the ratsdie Ratten hatten die Kiste angenagt
vinagen; to gnaw at somethingan etw (dat)nagen; (rust, disease)sich durch etw fressen; to gnaw at somebody (fig)jdn quälen; to gnaw on somethingan etw (dat)nagen; to gnaw through somethingetw durchnagen

gnaw

[nɔː]
1. vt (chew) → rosicchiare, rodere (fig) (subj, remorse) → rodere; (hunger, pain) → tormentare
2. vi to gnaw throughrosicchiare da una parte all'altra
to gnaw at → rosicchiare (fig) → rodere

gnaw

(noː) verb
to bite or chew with a scraping movement. The dog was gnawing a large bone; The mice have gnawed holes in the walls of this room.
gnawing adjective
annoying; disturbing. a gnawing problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Laws (Peter Mullan), who wears a collar but whose ties to any established church remain vague, becomes a gnawingly suspicious figure.
In the hands of producer Katie Mitchell it also becomes a dramatically stimulating, if at times gnawingly flawed, two hours.
It is always on those grey, damp, gnawingly cold days when the thought of messing about outside with water is pure purgatory.