goaded


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goad

 (gōd)
n.
1. A long stick with a pointed end used for prodding animals.
2. An agent or means of prodding or urging; a stimulus.
tr.v. goad·ed, goad·ing, goads
To prod or urge with or as if with a long pointed stick.

[Middle English gode, from Old English gād.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.goaded - compelled forcibly by an outside agency; "mobs goaded by blind hatred"
involuntary, nonvoluntary, unvoluntary - not subject to the control of the will; "involuntary manslaughter"; "involuntary servitude"; "an involuntary shudder"; "It (becoming a hero) was involuntary. They sank my boat"- John F.Kennedy
References in classic literature ?
At an unusually urgent prod, Tiha dropped a stone and was duly goaded while she sank to her knees and with one arm scooped it in against her side, regained her feet, and waddled on.
There is infinite variety in the gales of wind at sea, and except for the peculiar, terrible, and mysterious moaning that may be heard sometimes passing through the roar of a hurricane - except for that unforgettable sound, as if the soul of the universe had been goaded into a mournful groan - it is, after all, the human voice that stamps the mark of human consciousness upon the character of a gale.
Clearly she saw the long wagon-train, the lean, gaunt men who walked before, the youths goading the lowing oxen that fell and were goaded to their feet to fall again.
Usually he submitted with silent dignity to all which he had to go through, but, at times, he was goaded into comment.
There he stood hurling insults at Numa until the beast was again goaded into leaping upward at him, and as Numa rose the noose dropped quickly over his head and about his neck.
Perhaps the memory of a past defeat at Tarzan's hands goaded him.
He dashed his head against the knotted trunk; and, lifting up his eyes, howled, not like a man, but like a savage beast being goaded to death with knives and spears.
The sky had an arrogant blue which goaded the nerves like a spur.
The truth is that there was a something about Peter which goaded the pirate captain to frenzy.
That casting from his path a weeping mother, the goaded father at last dashed from the house yelling that he was away to buy a cane.
It may be a rough comforter: it may seem hard to be harassed with the cares of life when we have no relish for its enjoyments; to be goaded to labour when the heart is ready to break, and the vexed spirit implores for rest only to weep in silence: but is not labour better than the rest we covet?