goblin

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gob·lin

 (gŏb′lĭn)
n.
A grotesque elfin creature of folklore, thought to work mischief or evil.

[Middle English gobelin, from Norman French *gobelin, name of a ghost that supposedly haunted the town of Évreux in the 12th century.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

goblin

(ˈɡɒblɪn)
n
(European Myth & Legend) (in folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature, regarded as malevolent towards human beings
[C14: from Old French, from Middle High German kobolt; compare cobalt]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gob•lin

(ˈgɒb lɪn)

n.
a grotesque sprite that is mischievous or malicious.
[1300–50; < Middle French < Middle High German kobold goblin; see kobold]
syn: goblin, gnome, gremlin refer to supernatural beings thought to be malevolent to people. goblins are demons of any size, usu. in human or animal form, that are supposed to afflict and even torture human beings. gnomes are small ugly creatures that live in the earth, guarding mines, treasures, etc. They are mysteriously malevolent and terrify human beings by causing dreadful mishaps to occur. gremlins are thought to disrupt machinery and are active in modern folklore.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.goblin - (folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature that makes trouble for human beingsgoblin - (folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature that makes trouble for human beings
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
evil spirit - a spirit tending to cause harm
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
عِفْريت قَبيح المنظَر
skřítek
nissetrold
álfur, púki
aitvaraskaukas
rūķisvelniņš
gulyabanî

goblin

[ˈgɒblɪn] Nduende m, trasgo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

goblin

[ˈgɒblɪn] nlutin m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

goblin

nKobold m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

goblin

[ˈgɒblɪn] nfolletto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

goblin

(ˈgoblin) noun
a mischievous, ugly spirit. a frightening fairy-story about goblins.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
For the Andante had begun--very beautiful, but bearing a family likeness to all the other beautiful Andantes that Beethoven had written, and, to Helen's mind, rather disconnecting the heroes and shipwrecks of the first movement from the heroes and goblins of the third.
I want to have goblins about me, for I am courageous.
It was a Christmas Eve, too; and I remember that on that very night he told us the story about the goblins that carried away old Gabriel Grub.'
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
When the stories of ghosts and goblins went around, I kept quiet.
He squirms on his dunghill, and like a child lost in the dark among goblins, calls to the gods that he is their younger brother, a prisoner of the quick that is destined to be as free as they--monuments of egotism reared by the epiphenomena; dreams and the dust of dreams, that vanish when the dreamer vanishes and are no more when he is not.
The goblins of her fancy lurked in every shadow about her, reaching out their cold, fleshless hands to grasp the terrified small girl who had called them into being.
"The peasant women too tell us they have seen goblins."
Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand--when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find--all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies malevolent and fearful imps, Gulliver a most desolate wanderer in most dread and dangerous regions.
Mother Maudlin then calls for Puck-hairy, her goblin. He appears, crying:
But, awake and standing on his feet upon the boards where he had lately lain, he saw this Goblin Sight.
It is still very easy to believe in fairies when you see those goblin lanterns glimmering among the fir tassels.