gold bug


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gold bug

also gold·bug (gŏld′bŭg′)
n.
1. Any of several North American beetles, especially Charidotella sexpunctata, having a golden metallic luster. Also called gold beetle.
2. A supporter of the gold standard.
3. A speculator in or a purchaser of gold.
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References in periodicals archive ?
That's in part thanks to the efforts of a few eccentric gold bug authoritarians.
The Gold-Bug "You will observe that the stories told are all about money-seekers, not about money-finders." At the time of publishing, "The Gold Bug" was in fact Poe's most wildly successful story; today most of the author's fans would be at a loss to name this one.
44, The Mysterious Stranger, Edgar Allan Poe's The Man That Was Used Up and The Gold Bug, Nathaniel Hawthorne's Mr.
Chapter 9, perhaps the most robust attempt to decipher one of Poe's works in the volume, is Henri Justin's "No Kidding: 'The Gold Bug' Is True to Its Title." Justin provides a minute analysis in which he acknowledges the influence of Roman Jakobson for his reading of poetic functions, symmetry of opposites, bivalves, and emblems in Poe's distinctive story "The Gold Bug," with a special focus on its title.
The Gold Bug Bites Texas Politicians, The New York Times
If you fancy panning for precious yellow dust check out Hangtown's Gold Bug Mine or take the selfguided audio tour through the shaft to gain an insight into what the golddigging 49ers had to endure.
"The Gold Bug" (1843) (Poe 1975: 42-70) refines the popular themes of piracy and treasure hunting into highbrow fiction; Poe transforms "the digressive, the superstitious, the blackly humorous" vein of popular sources by "purposely" adding "rigorous structure and intellectuality to modes he believed lapsed into formlessness or grotesque." Concerning the protagonist of Poe's tale, the critic remarks that he is "an imaginative thinker faced with a challenging enigma, and the main drama of the tale lies in the mental process by which Legrand traces mysterious clues to a solution" (Reynolds 1989: 531-532).
Not even the nuttiest gold bug can now deny that commodities are mired in a vicious bear market that could last for at least the next two years.
It is a collection of 10 pirate stories - a mixture of old tales (including excerpts from Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson and The Gold Bug by Edgar Allan Poe), stories from ancient mythology and brand new adventures.
I'm not a "gold bug." I have never invested in it and, personally, I would not advise a client on it.