gold mine


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gold mine

n. Informal
A rich or plentiful source of something desired.

gold mine

n
1. (Mining & Quarrying) a place where gold ore is mined
2. a source of great wealth, profit, etc
ˈgold-ˌminer n
ˈgold-ˌmining n

gold′ mine`


n.
1. a mine yielding gold.
2. a source of great wealth or profit.
3. a copious source or reserve.
[1425–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gold mine - a good source of something that is desired
source - a facility where something is available
2.gold mine - a mine where gold ore is found
mine - excavation in the earth from which ores and minerals are extracted
References in classic literature ?
Surely a Goose which can lay such eggs as those must have a gold mine inside her.
Anyone owning real estate on which china clay can be discovered strikes a sort of gold mine.
Oh, by the way, I heard of a rather good thing today, New Kleinfonteins; it's a gold mine in Rhodesia.
Also, he needed her money for his ventures and for his gold mine in Eastern Ecuador where the painted Indians live.
Had he discovered a gold mine, greater delight could not have shone upon his features.
and make dissensions, not for a annual gold mine, and found in tea and sugar.
It consisted partly of a gold mine in Eldorado, and of ten thousand shares in a broken bubble, and of half a million acres of vineyard at the North Pole, and of a castle in the air, and a chateau in Spain, together with all the rents and income therefrom accruing.
Thomas Sanders sold his stock for somewhat less than a million dollars, and presently lost most of it in a Colorado gold mine.
If he had but stayed at home he would have discovered his genius in time really to start some new variety of awful architectural hare and run it till it burrowed in a gold mine.
An orchard, good tillage, good grounds, seem a fixture, like a gold mine, or a river, to a citizen; but to a large farmer, not much more fixed than the state of the crop.
An' if him an' father 'd held onto the land it'd been better than a gold mine, an' I wouldn't be workin' for a livin'.
Though such a piece of news was like a gold mine to work in the monotonous lives of these personages, the observant and distrustful chevalier thought he recognized in the worthy woman a far more extended sentiment; namely, the joy caused by the triumph of self-interest.