goneness

goneness

(ˈɡɒnnəs)
n
faintness from hunger
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Her throat was parched, a dull ache never ceased in her breast, and she was oppressed by a feeling of goneness. WHY, WHY?--And from the puzzle of the world came no solution.
But ever--and here the torment lay--she was drawn back from these far-wanderings to her present trouble, with its parch in the throat, its ache in the breast, and its gnawing, vacant goneness.
I wasn't in a temper anymore--and it left a dreadful sort of goneness, too.
So you have a double sense of goneness in these stories, a ghostliness that is not so much tragic as grimly hilarious.
As Kristeva's observations on the female literary subject suggest, female drug literature re-writes the abject, non-conforming subject away from the voiceless positionality of semiotic "goneness" and into a new place--perhaps even a new symbolic order of its own empowerment ("Powers of Horror" 2).
I overwrite him, in his death, his goneness. His life becomes a palimpsest.
And sure as the red-orange sun will cross the sky, I set off across the country to reclaim the goneness of my ever-fading soul.
It seems to me, so far anyway, that death is simply this: the stark, colossal goneness of a once substantial, infinitely complex presence.
It is more the goneness of what is gone than the whatness of what is gone that lays us low.
A painting of the sky over ground zero is hardly needed, since the reality of their goneness inflects the glamour of everything that remains of the Manhattan skyline.
First he paid homage to the "goneness" of substantive due process: