gonococcus


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gon·o·coc·cus

 (gŏn′ə-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. gon·o·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī′, -kŏk′ī′)
The bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea.

gon′o·coc′cal (-kŏk′əl), gon′o·coc′cic (-kŏk′ĭk, -kŏk′sĭk) adj.

gonococcus

(ˌɡɒnəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Microbiology) a spherical Gram-negative bacterium, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that causes gonorrhoea: family Neisseriaceae
ˌgonoˈcoccal, ˌgonoˈcoccic adj
ˌgonoˈcoccoid adj

gon•o•coc•cus

(ˌgɒn əˈkɒk əs)

n., pl. -coc•ci (-ˈkɒk saɪ, -si)
the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, causing gonorrhea.
[1885–90]
gon`o•coc′cal, gon`o•coc′cic (-ˈkɒk sɪk) adj.
gon`o•coc′coid, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gonococcus - the pus-producing bacterium that causes gonorrheagonococcus - the pus-producing bacterium that causes gonorrhea
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
Translations

gon·o·coc·cus

n. gonococo, microorganismo de la especie Neisseria gonorrhoeae, causante de la gonorrea.

gonococcus

n (pl -ci) gonococo
References in periodicals archive ?
Gonorrhea is diagnosed by identifying the gonococcus at common sites of infection (the cervix in females and the urethra in males), and sometimes the rectum and throat, depending on sexual practices that may expose these sites.
Historically, gonococal urethritis used to be a common cause in the past,9 but with the advent of newer antibiotics, the incidence of gonococcus has decreased as a cause of stricture urethra.
During this time, however, the gonococcus acquired genetic mutations that conferred increasing penicillin resistance, necessitating increasingly higher doses of penicillin to ensure treatment success.
The versatile nature of the gonococcus and its capacity to cope with changing conditions in microenvironment is a major challenge in the prevention and control of gonococcal infection (6).
One possibility is that the gonococcus involves mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining-region (QRDR) of gyrA and the analogous of parC locus on the chromosome.
Since the introduction of sulphonamides in the 1930s, the gonococcus has shown itself to be a master of adaptability and has acquired a number of chromosomal and plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance mechanisms.
Septic arthritis is usually monoarticular; exceptions are cases caused by gonococcus or tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterium.