gonzo


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gon·zo

 (gŏn′zō)
adj. Slang
1. Using an exaggerated, highly subjective style, as in journalism: "a hyperkinetic, gonzo version of Graham Greene" (New Yorker).
2. Extreme, unconventional, or bizarre: gonzo artwork; a gonzo snowboarding style.
3. Crazy, excited, or unrestrained: Fans went gonzo when the band came out.

[Perhaps Italian, simpleton (perhaps short for Borgonzone, Burgundian) or Spanish ganso, dullard, goose (of Germanic origin; see ghans- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gonzo

(ˈɡɒnzəʊ)
adj
1. wild or crazy
2. (Journalism & Publishing) (of journalism) explicitly including the writer's feelings at the time of witnessing the events or undergoing the experiences written about
n, pl gonzos
a wild or crazy person
[C20: perhaps from Italian, literally: fool, or Spanish ganso idiot, bumpkin (literally: goose)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gon•zo

(ˈgɒn zoʊ)
adj.
Slang.
fiercely advocative or partial without regard for balance or objectivity.
[1970–75, Amer.; appar. first used by U.S. journalist Hunter S. Thompson (b. 1939); perhaps < Italian: simpleton]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gonzo - conspicuously or grossly unconventional or unusualgonzo - conspicuously or grossly unconventional or unusual; "restaurants of bizarre design--one like a hat, another like a rabbit"; "famed for his eccentric spelling"; "a freakish combination of styles"; "his off-the-wall antics"; "the outlandish clothes of teenagers"; "outre and affected stage antics"
unconventional - not conventional or conformist; "unconventional life styles"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asked why he had decided to compete in the show, Gonzo will reply: "I saw on YouTube in Japan Susan Boyle.
Scholars of journalism, literature, communications, and media explore how the Gonzo journalism that American journalist Hunter S.
Hit Songs "Sky" and "Weightless" show a new artistic side of how lyrically and diverse the tracks range on "Night Shift." Sergee Gonzo also finished the EP in fashion with the strong track of "Realize pt.
"Bar Gonzo perfectly complements the Cassa brand, offering guests and residents an urban escape," said Solly Assa, President and CEO of Assa Properties.
Robert Lee, head of corporate at Wright Hassall, said: "We would also like to say thank you to everyone who joined us and to Mick Leape, and his team from Beer Gonzo, for doing another fantastic job."
The journalist wrote in his will that his wife could continue living on the 42-acre property but it would be owned by the Gonzo Trust.
While many scholars are either primarily focused on what Acosta brings to Chicano literature, or on what he brings to the genre of gonzo journalism (as well as many other "mainstream" American literary genres of the 1950s, 60s and 70s), many more have acknowledged these mutual and competing influences as shaping our understanding of his work.
Lucie Byron, senior associate at Wright Hassall, said: "We were delighted to work with the team at Beer Gonzo again.
Eddie Butler's book Gonzo Davies Caught in Possession is a sequel to his best-selling novel The Head of Gonzo Davies and sees ex-international Number 8 Gonzo "grafting, inspiring and reviving his local club and village".
Gonzo, who is a first-time visitor in the country, said he was awed by the warm reception he received.