good offices


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good offices

pl.n.
Services done for another, especially when done as a mediator.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

good′ of′fices


n.pl.
1. services rendered, esp. by someone in an influential position.
2. services rendered by a mediator in a dispute.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
But such was either the hatred or avarice of this man, that instead of doing us the good offices he pretended, he advised the King to refuse our present, that he might draw from us something more valuable.
But the wood-fire is a kindly, cheerful, sociable spirit, sympathizing with mankind, and knowing that to create warmth is but one of the good offices which are expected from it.
In plain English, when you have made your fortune by the good offices of a friend, you are advised to discard him as soon as you can.
And Lucy perhaps at first might think only of procuring his good offices in my favour.
"Why I mean, that your friendships are generally interested; that it requires services and good offices to support it."
Her recent good offices by Anne had been enough in themselves, and their marriage, instead of depriving her of one friend, secured her two.
He ordered his coach to wait at a distance, and desired I would give him an hours audience; which I readily consented to, on account of his quality and personal merits, as well as of the many good offices he had done me during my solicitations at court.
Throughout the whole of the journey, the old chief and the guide were unremitting in their good offices, and continually on the alert to select the best roads, and assist them through all difficulties.
"Willingly, and a small return for your good offices."
He had been recommended to the favor of Judge Temple by the head of an eminent mercantile house in New York, with whom Marmaduke was in habits of intimacy, and accustomed to exchange good offices. At his first interview with the Frenchman, our Judge had discovered him to be a man of breeding, and one who had seen much more prosperous days in his own country.
'You encourage me to say that I have come here now, to beg your good offices.'
Vandenhuten's good offices; it was not on the ground of merit I could apply to him; no, I must stand on that of necessity: I had no work; I wanted work; my best chance of obtaining it lay in securing his recommendation.