gospeller


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

gos·pel·ler

also gos·pel·er  (gŏs′pə-lər)
n.
1. One who teaches or professes faith in a gospel.
2. One who reads or sings the Gospel as part of a church service.

gospeller

(ˈɡɒspələ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who reads or chants the Gospel in a religious service
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who professes to preach a gospel held exclusively by him or her and others of a like mind
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gospeller - a preacher of the Christian gospelgospeller - a preacher of the Christian gospel  
preacher, preacher man, sermoniser, sermonizer - someone whose occupation is preaching the gospel
televangelist - an evangelist who conducts services on television
References in classic literature ?
The man was a tall, lean, haggard personification of fanaticism, bearing on his breast this label,--A WANTON GOSPELLER,--which betokened that he had dared to give interpretations of Holy Writ unsanctioned by the infallible judgment of the civil and religious rulers.
It was the Wanton Gospeller. A sad and quiet smile flitted across the mild visage of Roger Williams.
Reprinted in "The Social Gospeller," Time, 18 November 1957.
An illiterate fisherman, White, we are told, "became something of a streetcorner preacher, a gospeller, during the reign of Edward".
Streitberger then examines the careers and the management of the Revels Office of Elizabeth's reign beginning with Sir Thomas Cawarden (1558-59) by reminding his readers that Elizabeth's claim to the throne "was based on parliamentary title, not right of inheritance." (33) Cawarden had been a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to Henry VIII; an ardent Protestant (or "gospeller"), and he came to the aid of Elizabeth in the early "anxious days" of her reign.
The listeners usually look at the Gospeller, and I always wonder if they're really taking it all in.
William Hutchison notes that to be a religious reformer did not mean one was a progressive and did not imply that one was a social gospeller; many period movements of "religious social reform" such as temperance were conservative (1976: 165 n.
These include a splendidly meaningless speech by a politician, a hot gospeller accompanied by an accomplished pastiche of Stainer and an advert for vivisection accompanied by a rather good facsimile of the bagpipes.
wth a pap[er] fixed on his breast, wth this, a WANTON GOSPELLER, written in capitall lettrs." (56) Davis connects this law to Hawthorne's having included in "Endicott and the Red Cross" a man standing on the meetinghouse steps "bearing on his breast this label,--A WANTON GOSPELLER." He concludes that this "makes it certain that Hawthorne in addition to his knowledge of the law ...
Chapter five, a reappraisal of social gospeller Norman Thomas, begins an arc of the book that examines the slow transformation of one strand of American socialism into neoconservatism.
'At his best [George] was a torch-bearer, and a prelate of words; at his worst he may have been a gospeller and a demagogue' (Garland 1934, p.
This ubiquitous personality, this modern gospeller, this irrepressible character, this herald of the dawn is the Newsvendor." (74) The newsboy was, in the writer's view, an essential link between readers and the outside world, between readers and modernity.