goss

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goss

(ɡɒs)
vb (intr)
dialect English to spit

goss

(ɡɒs)
n
informal short for gossip
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

goss

n (Brit inf: = gossip) → Klatsch m (inf); have you heard the latest goss?weißt du schon das Neueste?
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Gosse. It is manifested especially in the even finish of his varied work, in the equality of his level--a high level--in species of composition so varied as the three specimens which follow.
Gosse's purely descriptive power, his aptitude for still-life and landscape, is unmistakably vivid and sound.
Gosse, whose acquaintance with northern lands and northern literature is special.
Gosse. His work is like exquisite modern Latin verse, into the academic shape of which, discreet and coy, comes a sincere, deeply felt consciousness of modern life, of the modern world as it is.
Gosse, with all his accomplishment, is still a young man.
Gosse to be also returning to the thoughts, the fears, the consolations, of its youth in Greece, in Italy:--
Garnett and Gosse's 'Illustrated History of English Literature, four volumes, published by the Macmillan Co.
In 1917 Albert Einstein published a paper on cosmology--indeed the first significant modern paper on the subject--that was sufficiently implausible that he felt compelled at one point to write, "In the present paragraph I shall conduct the reader over the road I have myself traveled, rather a rough and winding road, because otherwise I cannot hope that he will take much interest in the result at the end of the journey." When it comes to the principal subject of this essay, Sir Edmund Gosse, I know what he meant, and for this reason I shall conduct the "reader over the road" that led me to that rather unlikely figure.
Once one starts this, one is inevitably led to the figure of Sir Edmund Gosse.
In 1899 Gosse published a two-volume biography of Donne titled The Life and Letters of John Donne.
Likewise, if Gosse had not written his great biography in 1899, then Donne would surely have been rediscovered anyway.
In all of Gosse's gigantic production, the only book that is still widely read is his autobiographical memoir, Father and Son, which he published in 1907.