gossipy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

gos·sip

 (gŏs′əp)
n.
1. Rumor or talk of a personal, sensational, or intimate nature.
2. A person who habitually spreads intimate or private rumors or facts.
3. Trivial, chatty talk or writing.
4. A close friend or companion.
5. Chiefly British A godparent.
intr.v. gos·siped, gos·sip·ing, gos·sips
To engage in or spread gossip: gossiped about the neighbors.

[Middle English godsib, gossip, godparent, from Old English godsibb : god, god; see god + sibb, kinsman; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

gos′sip·er n.
gos′sip·ry n.
gos′sip·y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gossipy - prone to friendly informal communication
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray

gossipy

adjective
Inclined to gossip:
Translations
مُحب للقيل والقال
upovídaný
pletykás
slúîurgjarn

gossipy

[ˈgɒsɪpɪ] ADJde cotilleo, chismoso; [style] → familiar, anecdótico

gossipy

[ˈgɒsɪpi] adj
[book, account] → plein(e) de bavardages
[person] → cancanier/ière

gossipy

adj persongeschwätzig; book, letterim Plauderton geschrieben; the gossipy world of publishingdie klatschsüchtige Welt des Verlagswesens; a long gossipy phone callein langer Schwatz or Tratsch am Telefon (inf); gossipy stylePlauderton m

gossipy

[ˈgɒsɪpɪ] adj
a. (pej) → pettegolo/a
a gossipy letter → una lettera piena di pettegolezzi
b. (tone) → frivolo/a

gossip

(ˈgosip) noun
1. talk about other people's affairs, not always truthful. I never pay any attention to gossip.
2. a chat. She dropped in for a cup of coffee and a gossip.
3. a person who listens to and passes on gossip. She's a dreadful gossip.
verb
1. to pass on gossip.
2. to chat.
ˈgossipy adjective
fond of gossiping. gossipy neighbours.
gossip column
an article in a newspaper etc containing gossip about famous people.
References in classic literature ?
Madame Selarne was in a gossipy mood and they found many mutual acquaintances.
Toward the shaven monk who trudged along with his cowl tilted back and the sweat washing down his fat jowls, the coal-burner was deeply reverent; to the gentleman he was abject; with the small farmer and the free mechanic he was cordial and gossipy; and when a slave passed by with a counte- nance respectfully lowered, this chap's nose was in the air -- he couldn't even see him.
And I don't think a whole lot of those gossipy old porpoises either.
"What is the news?" said the gossipy tinker, pricking up his ear; "I am a tinker by trade, Middle by name, and come from over against Banbury."
By apparently careless and purposeless questioning I learned from my gossipy landlady that the young woman's bedroom adjoined my own, a party-wall between.
"Ned writes good, gossipy letters I taught him how and he tells me all that 's going on.
He's led his gossipy neighbour to believe he has cancer and people are stopping me in the street to commiserate.
This breezy, even gossipy account of two centuries of alpine adventure is a good introduction to the vast literature on the topic.
STARS IN MY EYES by Don Bachardy (The University of Wisconsin Press, $34,95) An astute portraitist as well as the life partner of the late Christopher Isherwood, Bachardy also shows a great memory for gossipy detail in his anecdotes about the celebrities--including Bette Davis--who sat for him.
If he comes over in public as he does in private - a jokey, gossipy, football-mad family guy - then he'll knock David Cameron off his bike.
The life of a high-school freshman princess, it seems, is fraught with peril--and also with lots of funny and gossipy details about boys, dresses, and famous people: Martha Stewart helps Mia with her Halloween costume, for example.
A quarrelsome, gossipy lot, these writers are the real focus of our interest as we read, partly because Picano has gleefully cast his colleagues--men we've come to know as heroic messengers of the good gay word--as slightly smarmy old queens.