governed


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gov·ern

 (gŭv′ərn)
v. gov·erned, gov·ern·ing, gov·erns
v.tr.
1. To make and administer the public policy and affairs of (a state, for example); exercise sovereign authority over.
2. To control the speed or magnitude of; regulate: a valve that governs fuel intake.
3. To control the actions or behavior of: Govern yourselves like civilized people.
4. To keep under control; restrain: a student who could not govern his impulses.
5. To exercise a deciding or determining influence on: Chance usually governs the outcome of the game.
6. Grammar To require (a specific morphological form) of accompanying words.
v.intr.
1. To exercise political authority.
2. To have or exercise a determining influence.

[Middle English governen, from Old French governer, from Latin gubernāre, from Greek kubernān.]

gov′ern·a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.governed - the body of people who are citizens of a particular government; "governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed"--Declaration of Independence
citizenry, people - the body of citizens of a state or country; "the Spanish people"
References in classic literature ?
I answer that the principalities of which one has record are found to be governed in two different ways; either by a prince, with a body of servants, who assist him to govern the kingdom as ministers by his favour and permission; or by a prince and barons, who hold that dignity by antiquity of blood and not by the grace of the prince.
The entire monarchy of the Turk is governed by one lord, the others are his servants; and, dividing his kingdom into sanjaks, he sends there different administrators, and shifts and changes them as he chooses.
The contrary happens in kingdoms governed like that of France, because one can easily enter there by gaining over some baron of the kingdom, for one always finds malcontents and such as desire a change.
but the society of many families, which was first instituted for their lasting, mutual advantage, is called a village, and a village is most naturally composed of the descendants of one family, whom some persons call homogalaktes, the children and the children's children thereof: for which reason cities were originally governed by kings, as the barbarian states now are, which are composed of those who had before submitted to kingly government; for every family is governed by the elder, as are the branches thereof, on account of their relationship thereunto, which is what Homer says, "Each one ruled his wife and child;" and in this scattered manner they formerly lived.
The changes suggested by the Education Secretary indicate that schools should continue to be governed on the basis of this stakeholder approach but with a much sharper focus on the skills that they have within the governance field - known as the 'stakeholder plus' approach to governance.
Ontario's 618 long-term care facilities will be governed by one statute, replacing the three laws which have governed these facilities for many years.
These were the very principles and materials she now rediscovered as having governed atopian objects and spaces from Kurt Schwitters to Beuys.
Rules evolved that governed each individual's behavior toward other members of the group.
Instead, in Otsuka's world, people would freely choose to be governed by feudal lords with powers of life and death over them.
10) This proposal significantly expanded the definition of tax shelter opinions governed by Circular 230.
Building owners and managers and cleaning contractors with employees governed by the labor contracts between the Realty Advisory Board and either Local 32B-32J, SEIU (residential, commercial or cleaning contractor agreements) or Local 94, IUOE, should be aware that there is a provision in those contracts that requires employees to file a grievance with the union and arbitrate any employment discrimination clams they have against the employer rather than filing such claims in court.

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