governess


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gov·er·ness

 (gŭv′ər-nĭs)
n.
A woman employed to educate and train the children of a private household.

[Middle English governesse, short for governouresse, from Old French governeresse, feminine of governeor, governor, from Latin gubernātor; see gubernatorial.]

governess

(ˈɡʌvənɪs)
n
(Education) a woman teacher employed in a private household to teach and train the children

gov•ern•ess

(ˈgʌv ər nɪs)

n.
1. a woman employed in a private household to take charge of a child's upbringing and education.
2. Archaic. a woman who is a ruler or governor.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French]
gov′er•ness•y, adj.
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.governess - a woman entrusted with the care and supervision of a child (especially in a private home)governess - a woman entrusted with the care and supervision of a child (especially in a private home)
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching

governess

noun tutor, teacher He studied under the strict tutelage of his English governess.
Translations
guvernanta

governess

[ˈgʌvənɪs] Ninstitutriz f, gobernanta f

governess

[ˈgʌvərnəs] ngouvernante f

governess

nGouvernante f, → Hauslehrerin f

governess

[ˈgʌvnɪs] ngovernante f, istitutrice f
References in classic literature ?
The Fynes had no suspicion; the governess, playing with cold, distinguished exclusiveness the part of mother to the fabulously wealthy Miss de Barral, had no suspicion; the masters of music, of drawing, of dancing to Miss de Barral, had no idea; the minds of her medical man, of her dentist, of the servants in the house, of the tradesmen proud of having the name of de Barral on their books, were in a state of absolute serenity.
Monson, with their only son, John Monson, their three daughters, the governess, and Betts Shoreham, were all present; the latter having dropped in with a new novel for the ladies.
My governess did her part as a midwife with the greatest art and dexterity imaginable, and far beyond all that ever I had had any experience of before.
Meantime, I searched, with great interest, the advertising columns of the newspapers, and wrote answers to every 'Wanted a Governess' that appeared at all eligible; but all my letters, as well as the replies, when I got any, were dutifully shown to my mother; and she, to my chagrin, made me reject the situations one after another: these were low people, these were too exacting in their demands, and these too niggardly in their remuneration.
It is quite true that I offered to be their governess, if they ever wanted one, on the day when I left them to return to London.
Without a governess, you must have been neglected."
I ring for coffee, cigarette, and cherry brandy, and take my chair by the window, just as the absurd little nursery governess comes tripping into the street.
"Something wrong between the lady and the governess," he said.
Your sister has the good old governess to take care of her, and the courier to relieve her of all trouble on the journey.
Crawley asked what the young people were reading, the governess replied "Smollett." "Oh, Smollett," said Mr.
Mamma, however, is only going to bring Mary and Gus and Fred and Adelaide abroad with her; the others will remain at Kingscote until February (about the 3d), when they will go to Eastbourne for a month with Miss Turnover, the new governess, who has turned out such a very nice person.
It's true it's bad HER having been a governess in our house.

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