gradiometer

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gradiometer

(ˌɡrædɪˈɒmɪtə)
n
1. (General Physics) physics an instrument for measuring the gradient of a magnetic field
2. (Surveying) surveying an instrument used to ensure that a long gradient remains constant
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References in periodicals archive ?
The archaeologists will also demonstrate sensing equipment including ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and gradiometers that are currently being used in the work.
Hardwick, "Important design considerations for inboard airborne magnetic gradiometers," Geophysics, vol.
Gradiometers can significantly reduce the environmental noise, and the reduction ratio of a typical first-order gradiometer is believed to reach almost two orders of magnitude [6], although the noise reduction capability strongly depends on the precision in sensor manufacturing.
MEG measures were acquired with a CTF MEG system (MISL, Vancouver, Canada) with 275 MEG gradiometers. Eye blinks, eye movements, and electrocardiogram (EKG) were recorded using bipolar electrodes, and the head position within the helmet was continuously monitored thanks to three localization coils placed on anatomical landmarks (the nasion and the left and right ear canals).
The MEG system has 306 sensors grouped in triplets consisting of 2 planar gradiometers and 1 magnetometer distributed at 102 locations.
Workshop sessions were also included to better understand some of the widely used survey equipments such as underwater gyros, magnetometers & gradiometers, side scan sonars & sub bottom profilers, tide gauges, wave sensors and meteorological & water quality sensors.
The PSD mean of the 16 inner axial gradiometers, covering a circular area of about 12 cm diameter, was taken as the total PSD.
This volume explores a wide array of geoinformatic techniques utilized by archaeologists working in the Caribbean, including geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS), as well as aerial photography, cartography, and geophysical surveys that employ magnetometers, gradiometers, resistivity meters, and soil thermography.
The Berlin group measured MCGs using 49 non-contact SQUID gradiometers, obtaining recordings of MCGs in cardiac patients and normal subjects.
With ground-penetrating radar and other so-called geophysical technologies, such as gradiometers that can detect small variations within a magnetic field, researchers can limit their excavations, says Armin Schmidt of the University of Bradford in England.
Other well-known technologies under consideration are magnetometers and gradiometers, which discover hidden devices by seeking telltale magnetic anomalies.