grains


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grain

 (grān)
n.
1.
a. A small, dry, one-seeded fruit of a cereal grass, having the fruit and the seed walls united: a single grain of wheat; gleaned the grains from the ground one at a time. Also called caryopsis.
b. The fruits of cereal grasses especially after having been harvested, considered as a group: The grain was stored in a silo.
2.
a. A cereal grass: Wheat is a grain grown in Kansas.
b. Cereal grasses considered as a group: Grain is grown along the river.
3.
a. A relatively small discrete particulate or crystalline mass: a grain of sand.
b. A small amount or the smallest amount possible: hasn't a grain of sense.
4. Aerospace A mass of solid propellant.
5. Abbr. gr. A unit of weight in the US Customary System, an avoirdupois unit equal to 0.002285 ounce (0.065 gram).
6.
a. The markings, pattern, or texture of the fibrous tissue in wood: Cherry wood has a fine grain.
b. The direction of such markings: cut a board with the grain.
7.
a. The side of a hide or piece of leather from which the hair or fur has been removed.
b. The pattern or markings on this side of leather.
8. The pattern produced, as in stone, by the arrangement of particulate constituents.
9. The relative size of the particles composing a substance or pattern: a coarse grain.
10. A painted, stamped, or printed design that imitates the pattern found in wood, leather, or stone.
11. The direction or texture of fibers in a woven fabric.
12. A state of fine crystallization.
13.
a. Basic temperament or nature; disposition: It goes against my grain to ask for help.
b. An essential quality or characteristic: "Toughness as a virtue ... is, needless to say, fully embedded in the American grain" (Benjamin DeMott).
14. Archaic Color; tint.
v. grained, grain·ing, grains
v.tr.
1. To cause to form into grains; granulate.
2. To paint, stamp, or print with a design imitating the grain of wood, leather, or stone.
3. To give a granular or rough texture to.
4. To remove the hair or fur from (hides) in preparation for tanning.
v.intr.
To form grains: The corn began to grain.
Idioms:
against the grain
Contrary to custom, one's inclination, or good sense.
with a grain of salt
With reservations; skeptically: Take that advice with a grain of salt.

[Middle English, from Old French graine, from Latin grānum; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots.]

grain′er n.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And did you do it because your appetite was so small, or did you wish to count the grains so that you might never eat more than a certain number?
I stand amid the roar Of a surf-tormented shore, And I hold within my hand Grains of the golden sand -- How few!
"Let me see," said Margolotte; "of those qualities she must have 'Obedience' first of all," and she took down the bottle bearing that label and poured from it upon a dish several grains of the contents.
Round, fair, and considerate are they to one another, as grains of sand are round, fair, and considerate to grains of sand.
"That wasn't right, it was silly, Emma Jane; but I'll tell you where it might come in--in Give me Three Grains of Corn.
There was field upon field of ripening grain, with well-paved roads running between, and pretty rippling brooks with strong bridges across them.
He was a grain merchant and cattle-buyer, and was generally considered the most enterprising business man in our county.
A POLITICIAN seeing a fat Turkey which he wanted for dinner, baited a hook with a grain of corn and dragged it before the fowl at the end of a long and almost invisible line.
When the winter came the Grasshopper had no food and found itself dying of hunger, while it saw the ants distributing every day corn and grain from the stores they had collected in the summer.
Take this tiny grain of sand, and put it into the ground as close as you can to the gate of the castle.
She also knew that neither her father nor her brother would refuse to help the peasants in need, she only feared to make some mistake in speaking about the distribution of the grain she wished to give.
They came to a small clearing of several acres, where the grain stood waist high.