grains of paradise


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grains of paradise

(grānz)
pl.n.
The pungent aromatic seeds of a tropical African plant (Aframomum melegueta), used medicinally and for flavoring foods and beverages.

grains of paradise

pl n
(Plants) the peppery seeds of either of two African zingiberaceous plants, Aframomum melegueta or A. granum-paradisi, used as stimulants, diuretics, etc. Also called: guinea grains
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grains of paradise - West African plant bearing pungent peppery seedsgrains of paradise - West African plant bearing pungent peppery seeds
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Aframomum, genus Aframomum - an African genus of plants of the family Zingiberaceae
References in periodicals archive ?
One of these is tapairis which had been taken to be some kind of medicinal substance but in effect is not a word at all, since it arose from an incorrect division of two other words literally meaning 'grains of paradise', the term for Guinea grains.
Ingredients of the product are handpicked and foraged in various countries, with the gin made from infusing traditional juniper berries with botanicals of coriander, angelica root, grains of paradise, lemon, cinnamon, rowan berries, winter savoury, orris root powder and kaffir lime leaves.
Classic botanicals of cardamom, grains of paradise, pink pepper, juniper, iris and coriander combine with hand-picked provence botanicals of thyme, fennel, eucalyptus, mint and pink grapefruit.
It includes 50 in-depth spice profiles from paprika and cinnamon to lesser known spices like amchoor and grains of paradise. There are also recpies to try like West African peanut curry with Durban masala and tamarind granita with caramelized pineapple.
Blend the onion, grains of paradise, ginger and chilies into a paste and then add steamed beef with stock.
Botanicals include elderflower, coriander seeds, Spanish orange peel, Italian lemon peel, Guatemalan green cardamom, grains of paradise from Africa, angelica root and orris root.
Among them, there are six different types of pepper, as well as almond, bitter orange, blackberry, cardamom, chamomile, cinnamon, lemon verbena, cloves, coriander, cranberries, dog rose, elderflower, ginger, Grains of Paradise, hawthorn berries, honeysuckle, jasmine, Kaffir lime, lavender, lemon, lemon balm, lemongrass, nutmeg, pimento, pomelo, rosehip, sage, and sloe.
Chiliheads will find their favorite peppers well represented in this cookbook, but other heat sources are explored too, including galangal, horseradish, cubeb, long pepper, and the delightfully named grains of paradise. The authors researched condiments from cultures as diverse as Hawaii and Bulgaria, and recount their many experiments, including the flops, in irreverent, casual prose.
The only two species of Old World plants that brought any "heat" to food was the West African grains of paradise (Aframomum melegueta) that became supplanted by the far superior black pepper (Piper nigrum), whose trade and price was tightly controlled by the Dutch.
Beehive's Jack Rabbit Gin is made with juniper berries, lemon peel, sage leaves, coriander seeds, orris root, grains of paradise and rose petals.
Nitro White Ale (5.5% ABV) is made with orange peel, coriander and Grains of Paradise, with hints of orange and peppery spice and a light wheat character.
Spent juniper berries, lemon peels, grains of paradise, coriander, cubeb berries, orris root, almonds, cassia bark, licorice and angelica are burned with other organic matter to create the heat needed to distill gin.