grandiflora


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grandiflora

(ˌɡrændɪˈflɔːrə)
adj
(Botany) botany (of a plant) producing large flowers

gran•di•flo•ra

(ˌgræn dəˈflɔr ə, -ˈfloʊr ə)

n., pl. -ras.
any of several plant varieties or hybrids characterized by large showy flowers, as certain long-stemmed roses.
[1900–05; < New Latin, a specific epithet frequent in the names of such flowers; see grand, -i-, flora]
References in periodicals archive ?
Relocation of Espeletia grandiflora (Asteraceae) plants as a strategy for enrichment of disturbed paramo areas (PNN Chingaza, Colombia).
Nardostachys grandiflora is among the highly renowned medicinal and aromatic plants of this region.
O objetivo deste trabalho foi obter informacoes sobre a reproducao de Qualea grandiflora, estudando a resposta germinativa das sementes frente ao fator temperatura.
grandiflora and P oleracea are amphistomatic while those of P quadrifida are epistomatic.
Fifteen Polemonioideae species from nine genera occur in South America (discounting putatively recently naturalized species such as Collomia grandiflora; Puntieri & Brion, 2005), primarily along the west coast, which shares many climatic and ecological similarities to western North America.
grandiflora que provocam surtos de morte subita e grandes perdas economicas, principalmente nos estados do Amazonas, norte do Mato Grosso, norte de Goias, Roraima, Amapa, Rondonia, Acre e oeste do Maranhao.
Abstract: This study aimed to isolate and characterise purified compound from the root of Sesbania grandiflora. The root of Sesbania grandiflora provided a new natural compound: l,l'-binaphthalene-2,2'-diol (1) together with two known isoflavanoids (2-3).
Petunia Express is the leading grandiflora with big flowers in bright blousy colours, ideal for beds and tubs.
The seed cone of a Magnolia grandiflora releases reddishorange seeds.
* WATER PRIMROSE (Ludwigia Grandiflora) The species, sold as a pond plant, can spread rapidly, strangling native species.
Hills-of-Snow hydrangea, Hydrangea arborescens Grandiflora, found in Ohio before 1900, has sustained our gardens for years.