grange


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grange

 (grānj)
n.
1. Grange Chiefly Northeastern US
a. An association of farmers founded in the United States in 1867.
b. One of the branch lodges of this association.
2. Chiefly British A farm, especially the residence and outbuildings of a gentleman farmer.
3. Archaic A granary.

[Middle English, granary, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *grānica, from Latin grānum, seed; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots.]

grange

(ɡreɪndʒ)
n
1. (Agriculture) chiefly Brit a farm, esp a farmhouse or country house with its various outbuildings
2. (Historical Terms) history an outlying farmhouse in which a religious establishment or feudal lord stored crops and tithes in kind
3. (Agriculture) archaic a granary or barn
[C13: from Anglo-French graunge, from Medieval Latin grānica, from Latin grānum grain]

Grange

(ɡreɪndʒ)
(in the US) n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Grange an association of farmers that strongly influenced state legislatures in the late 19th century
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a lodge of this association

grange

(greɪndʒ)

n.
1. a farm, with its nearby buildings.
2. (cap.) the Patrons of Husbandry, a farmers' organization formed in 1867 for social and cultural purposes.
3. Archaic. a barn or granary.
[1150–1200; < Anglo-French « Latin grān(um) grain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grange - an outlying farmgrange - an outlying farm      
farm - workplace consisting of farm buildings and cultivated land as a unit; "it takes several people to work the farm"
Translations

grange

[greɪndʒ] N (US) (Agr) → cortijo m, alquería f (Brit) → casa f solariega, casa f de señor

grange

nBauernhof m, → (kleiner) Gutshof
References in classic literature ?
I suppose we could get brick over from La Grange, if you cared for it, but it would take longer.
They have filled some flour sacks with clean dry moss from the woods, and put half a dozen blankets on the top, and they hope you can get along until the messenger who starts to-night for La Grange can bring some bedding over."
"But the hired men--the superintendent and his workmen--were the only ones who ever got anything out of your last experience with Colonel Waters at La Grange, and--and we at least lived among civilized people there."
"Was it an invitation to you to go and stay at the Grange?"
I want you to manage it; I want you to start for the Grange to-morrow."
Go to the Grange to-morrow, and stay there a week in Miss Brock's society.
I do myself the honour of calling as soon as possible after my arrival, to express the hope that I have not inconvenienced you by my perseverance in soliciting the occupation of Thrushcross Grange: I heard yesterday you had had some thoughts - '
'Thrushcross Grange is my own, sir,' he interrupted, wincing.
It was hardly a year since they had come to live at Tipton Grange with their uncle, a man nearly sixty, of acquiescent temper, miscellaneous opinions, and uncertain vote.
She was open, ardent, and not in the least self-admiring; indeed, it was pretty to see how her imagination adorned her sister Celia with attractions altogether superior to her own, and if any gentleman appeared to come to the Grange from some other motive than that of seeing Mr.
She had a fancy for something rural, and, besides, no one would be in London then, so she left her boxes for a few weeks at Oniton Grange, and her banns were duly published in the parish church, and for a couple of days the little town, dreaming between the ruddy hills, was roused by the clang of our civilization, and drew up by the roadside to let the motors pass.
That was the Grange, remarked Albert, over his shoulder, and then he jammed the brake on, and the motor slowed down and stopped.