grannom


Also found in: Wikipedia.

grannom

(ˈɡrænəm)
n
(Animals) a widespread caddis fly, Brachycentrus subnubilus, the larvae of which attach their cases to vegetation under running water and are esteemed as a bait by anglers
[C18: altered from green tail]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Out on a few occasions I have also witnessed significant hatches of Large Dark Olives, Grannom Sedge and Hawthorn Flies during the last week or so.
His dry flies were all on the bushy side and some - especially that Grannom and Dai's Alder - carried three to four hackles and were always effective.
The grannom fly was seen hatching on rivers Usk and Teifi as early as April 1 - but as this was so early, the anglers missed out the usual bonanza.
The grannom - the Mayfly of the Usk and Teifi - were hatching some 10 days early and although the numbers are way down from a few decades ago, there were sufficient to help the fish recover.
However it is good to record that last year a fair number of grannom fly hatches were witnessed on many rivers in Wales and the trout thoroughly enjoyed the banquet as the flies descended on the water like manna from above.
The trout then seem completely satiated after feasting on the grannom and as Dai had eight mouths to feed, he had to come up with a somewhat spectacular fly and this is when he devised a small black fly - which some called Blackie and which was later christened Doctor and later still amended to Lady Doctor by Vicar Powell.
In recent years there has been grave concern that the fly life has declined because of pollution, but it is good to be able to say that the grannom fly - although not in the trillions as of old - were about in sufficient numbers to get the fish on the fin and readily feasting on this daily manna.
The early arrival of the Grannom fly - in some places 20 days earlier than normal - gave the fish the urge to bite and brought with it some challenging sport.
The most important fly family on many a Welsh river is the grannom and despite all the pollution problems they are still to be seen on some rivers.
One sunny afternoon in mid-May I spent some time on a bridge over the river Teifi watching the trout feed on a fly called the grannom.
These feathers make for an excellent copy of the wings of flies such as the grannom and March brown.
The grannom fly is to Welsh rivers what the mayfly is to the chalk streams in England because the grannom is the early bite which brings the wild brown trout into condition.