graphicacy


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graphicacy

(ˈɡræfɪkəsɪ)
n
the ability to understand and use maps, plans, symbols, etc
[C20: formed on the model of literacy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Critical graphicacy: Understanding visual representation practices in school science.
On the road to graphicacy: The learning of graphical representation systems.
In the modern world, Arnheim (1969) concluded that this graphicacy, visual and graphic skills, remains as important to education as literacy and numeracy.
Anning (1997) addressed the importance of graphicacy, "...
This skill set is referred to generally as "graphicacy." (Aberg-Bengtsson & Ottosson, 2006).
Graphicacy: University students' skills in translating information.
Building a theory of graphicacy: How do students read graphs?
(13.) David Boardman, "The Development of Graphicacy: Children's Understanding of Maps," Geography 74, no.
Boardman D (1983) Graphicacy and Geography Teaching.
More than 30 years ago two eminent British professors of geography, WGV Balchin and Alice Coleman, coined the term `graphicacy' to describe the general skill involved in making and reading maps, claiming, in a feature article in The Times that graphicacy was the "fourth ace in the pack" and should be counted alongside oracy, literacy and numeracy as an essential skill for any well-educated child.
The ability to pose questions and then "display relevant data to answer them" (NCTM, 2000) encompasses graphicacy. Graphicacy is defined as "the demonstrated ability to comprehend and to produce graphics" (Aldrich et al., 2003, p.
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