graphite

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graph·ite

 (grăf′īt′)
n.
A soft crystalline allotrope of carbon, composed of graphene layers, having a steel-gray to black metallic luster and a greasy feel, used in lead pencils, lubricants, paints and coatings, and fabricated into a variety of forms such as molds, bricks, electrodes, crucibles, and rocket nozzles. Also called black lead, plumbago.

[Greek graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots + -ite.]

gra·phit′ic (gră-fĭt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

graphite

(ˈɡræfaɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a blackish soft allotropic form of carbon in hexagonal crystalline form: used in pencils, crucibles, and electrodes, as a lubricant, as a moderator in nuclear reactors, and, in a carbon fibre form, as a tough lightweight material for sporting equipment. Also called: plumbago
[C18: from German Graphit; from Greek graphein to write + -ite1]
graphitic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

graph•ite

(ˈgræf aɪt)

n.
a soft native carbon occurring in black to dark gray foliated masses: used for pencil leads, as a lubricant, as a moderator in nuclear reactors, and for making crucibles and other refractories; plumbago.
[1790–1800; < German Graphit < Greek gráph(ein) to write, draw + German -it -ite1]
gra•phit•ic (grəˈfɪt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

graph·ite

(grăf′īt′)
A naturally occurring, steel-gray to black, crystalline form of carbon. The carbon atoms in graphite are strongly bonded together in sheets. Because the bonds between the sheets are weak, other atoms can easily fit between them, causing the graphite to be soft and slippery to the touch. Graphite is used in pencils and paints and as a lubricant and electrode. It is also used to control chain reactions in nuclear reactors because of its ability to absorb neutrons. See Note at carbon.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.graphite - used as a lubricant and as a moderator in nuclear reactorsgraphite - used as a lubricant and as a moderator in nuclear reactors
pencil lead, lead - mixture of graphite with clay in different degrees of hardness; the marking substance in a pencil
atomic number 6, carbon, C - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
pencil - graphite (or a similar substance) used in such a way as to be a medium of communication; "the words were scribbled in pencil"; "this artist's favorite medium is pencil"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
رصاص أقلام، غرافيت
tuha
grafit
grafít
grafitas
grafīts

graphite

[ˈgræfaɪt] Ngrafito m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

graphite

[ˈgræfaɪt] ngraphite m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

graphite

nGrafit m, → Graphit m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

graphite

[ˈgræfaɪt] ngrafite f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

graphite

(ˈgrӕfait) noun
a form of carbon used in the leads of pencils.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
This vacuum economised the graphite points between which the luminous arc was developed--an important point of economy for Captain Nemo, who could not easily have replaced them; and under these conditions their waste was imperceptible.
He opened the kit bag and oiled his wheel, putting graphite on the chain and adjusting the bearings.
Marsden, "Review of the characterisation of nuclear graphites in UK reactors scheduled for decommissioning," Tech.
HTGR features its huge inventory of nuclear graphite in the HTGR core acting as reflector, moderator, or structure materials.
Graphite (which is a well-known Sri Lankan export due to Sri Lanka's unique graphites) is considered as 'the next big thing among future elements.' Two Professors of University of Manchester were awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work with graphene, the single layer graphite.
"There is considerable scope for partnership for Chinese firms in this sector here" said Minister Bathiudeen and added: "Lankan produced graphite, crystals, and ilmenite are of international standards.
* Stabilizing inoculants promote the formation of graphites during solidification, too, but they also promote the formation of fine pearlite during solid-state cooling to produce high strength castings with a minimum amount of chill.
In that article it was noted that a metallurgist might expand on the (AFS Metalcasting Dictionary) definition of inoculation as a process for improving graphite morphology, eliminating iron carbides, increasing eutectic cell count and reducing section sensitivity, "but," said the author, "for the foundryman whose metallurgical training takes place on the melt floor and not in the classroom or laboratory, that definition does little to increase his understanding of the inoculation process."
Proper inoculation will minimize the formation of B and D graphites and will result in castings having more uniform properties as well as improved machinability.
At the top of each sample, Type A graphite flakes are present.
ENPNewswire-July 31, 2019--Leading Edge Materials Produces Expandable Graphite In Line With Current Market Products from Woxna, Sweden
('Leading Edge Materials' or the 'Company') (TSXV: LEM) (OTCQB: LEMIF) (Nasdaq First North: LEMSE ) is pleased to announce the successful completion of the first phase of test work to manufacture expandable graphite using material from the Woxna graphite mine in Sweden.