grapholect

grapholect

(ˈɡræfəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics an established and standardized written language
References in periodicals archive ?
Hirsch's "trans-dialectal" grapholect that seemingly "belongs to no group or place in particular" (qtd.
"Dialect, Grapholect, and Story: Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker as Science Fiction." Science Fiction Studies 27 (November 2000) [381-417].
Mullen's article "Dialect, Grapholect ..." for a comprehensive analysis of "Riddleyspeak."
In fact, college language curricula almost always take as their object of study a "grapholect," a written version of a living or dead language that is part academic construction, part historical exigency, part power politics, part sophistry.
Historically, however, the humanistic study of language in undergraduate college courses has focused on acquiring a detailed knowledge of a grapholect, combining reading and writing, listening and speaking, in varying degrees.
This phenomenon, called diglossia, is found everywhere that a grapholect has been elaborated, but Arabic is somewhat more complicated since two distinct varieties of the same language are used side by side in the same speech community, each having a set of specialized functions.
De la Cardid Casas (1998) draws on Orality and Literacy's sketch of the relationship between speech and writing, especially the idea of a "grapholect" to analyze how Caribbean English creoles serve as a "poetic resource for the subversion of English colonialism" (p.
xii) Bizzell (1999) characterized academic writing as a "grapholect" that uses precise, formal language, is highly structured, and enforces an objective, skeptical, and argumentative world view.
The grapholect further excludes participants and other audiences by installing the researcher--and colleagues who evaluate the work--as "experts" possessing superior knowledge necessary to understand the jargon and ideas of the research.
Some found that the nature of what they sought to understand could not be effectively expressed within the limitations of the traditional scholarship grapholect's conventions.
According to Ong, "writing, commitment of word to space, enlarges the potentiality of language almost beyond measure, restructures thought, and in the process converts a certain few dialects into 'grapholects' ...
As Rabkin explains: The fantastic takes words and reconfigures their semantic ranges, puts them in new contexts, creates new grapholects for them, and in so doing it liberates us" (26).